Les Hunter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the soap opera character, see Les Hunter (Hollyoaks).
Les Hunter
No. 41, 35, 40, 4, 30
Power forward / Center
Personal information
Born (1942-08-16) August 16, 1942 (age 71)
Nashville, Tennessee
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)
Listed weight 210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school Pearl (Nashville, Tennessee)
College Loyola (Illinois) (1961–1964)
NBA draft 1964 / Round: 2 / Pick: 9th overall
Selected by the Detroit Pistons
Pro playing career 1964–1973
Career history
1964–1965 Baltimore Bullets
1967–1968 Minnesota Muskies (ABA)
1968–1969 Miami Floridians (ABA)
19691970 New York Nets (ABA)
1970–1972 Kentucky Colonels (ABA)
1972–1973 Memphis Tams (ABA)
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA and ABA statistics
Points 5,735 (12.3 ppg)
Rebounds 3,224 (6.9 rpg)
Assists 752 (1.6 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Leslie "Big Game" Hunter (born August 16, 1942) is an American former professional basketball player. He played professionally in the NBA and the ABA. Hunter attended Loyola University Chicago, where he was the starting center of the team that won the 1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship.

Early life[edit]

Hunter was born in Nashville, Tennessee. A 6'7" forward/center, Hunter attended Pearl High School and Loyola University Chicago. [1] At Loyola, he served as the starting center of the team that upset the University of Cincinnati to win the 1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship.[2][3]

Professional career[edit]

He was drafted by the Detroit Pistons in the 2nd round (11th pick overall) of the 1964 NBA Draft.[4] He played for one season (1964–1965) in the NBA with the Baltimore Bullets.

He was drafted in the 1972 ABA Draft.[5] Hunter spent six seasons (1967–1973) in the ABA with the Minnesota Muskies, Miami Floridians, New Jersey Nets, Kentucky Colonels, and Memphis Tams.[6] Hunter scored 5,735 points in his professional career and was a two-time ABA All-Star.[7][8] He played in the first ABA All-Star game in 1968 in Indianapolis.[9]

Life after basketball[edit]

After retiring from basketball, Hunter moved to Kansas City in 1976.[10] He owned a restaurant for ten years and now works as an instructor helping students who did not graduate take online classes to complete high school.[11]

Awards and honors[edit]

On July 11, 2013, in the Oval Office of the White House, Hunter and former Loyola teammates John Egan, Jerry Harkness and Ron Miller met with President Barack Obama to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the school's 1963 national championship.[12] To date it remains the only NCAA Division I basketball championship won by a university from the state of Illinois.[13] In September 2013, Harkness and the entire 1963 Loyola Ramblers NCAA Championship basketball team was inducted into the Chicagoland Sports Hall of Fame.[14] The 1963 Loyola Ramblers were inducted in the College Basketball Hall of Fame in November 2013,[15] making it the first team inducted into the Hall of Fame.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "TSSAA Proudly Salutes the 1966 Pearl Team Tennessee’s Glory Road". TSSAA. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Loyola's Title Was Turning Point for NCAA Hoops". CBS College Sports. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Greatest College Basketball Teams: Spotlight 1963 Loyola (Chi)". Stellar College Basketball. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Les Hunter". databaseBasketball.com. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Les Hunter". databaseBasketball.com. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Les Hunter". American Basketball Association Players. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Top 10 Greatest Chicago College Basketball Players - #7". Chicago College Baseball. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Les Hunter Basketball Card". National Museum of American History. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Jon Teitel's Interview Series: Loyola-Chicago Legend Les "Big Game" Hunter". collegehoops.net. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  10. ^ "College basketball hall calls its first team: The 1963 Loyola Ramblers". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Jon Teitel's Interview Series: Loyola-Chicago Legend Les "Big Game" Hunter". collegehoops.net. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Q & A WITH JERRY HARKNESS: 50 YEARS AFTER THE GAME OF CHANGE AND HIS TRIP TO THE WHITE HOUSE". Legends of Basketball. Retrieved December 28, 2013. 
  13. ^ "NCAA Champ Coach Rick Pitino Set for Hall of Fame Class of 2013 along with 1963 NCAA Champion Loyola Ramblers". Chicagoland Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved December 28, 2013. 
  14. ^ "NCAA Champ Coach Rick Pitino Set for Hall of Fame Class of 2013 along with 1963 NCAA Champion Loyola Ramblers". Chicagoland Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved December 28, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Loyola 1963 Men's Basketball NCAA Title Team To Enter The National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame". Loyola University. Retrieved December 28, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Loyola’s 1963 Championship Basketball Team Inducted Into Hall Of Fame". CBS Chicago. Retrieved December 28, 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

  • "Ramblers: Loyola Chicago 1963 - The Team That Changed the Color of College Basketball" by Michael Lenehan, published by Agate Publishing, Feb 18, 2013.

External links[edit]