Life-process model of addiction

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The life-process model of addiction is the view that addiction is not a disease but rather a habitual response and a source of gratification and security that can be understood only in the context of social relationships and experiences.

This model of addiction is in direct opposition to the disease model of addiction. The proponents of the life-process model argue that the biological mechanisms that might account for addictive behavior have not been identified and thus do not support using the term disease, preferring to emphasize the individual's ability to overcome addiction by repairing relationships and personal strength of will.

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