Liripipe

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"Portrait of a Young Man (Tymotheos)" by Jan van Eyck, 1432. The liripipe is draped forward at left (subject's right).

A liripipe (/ˈlɪrɪˌpp/;also liripoop, liripipion, liripion) is a historical part of clothing, the tail of a hood or cloak, or a long-tailed hood.

Description[edit]

With long-tailed hoods it includes in particular a chaperon or gugel, or the peak of a shoe. A graffito on the church wall of Swannington Church in Norfolk depicts a "late medieval woman wearing a long, laced gown and hood with a long liripipe ornament."[1]

In modern times, the liripipe mostly refers to an element of academic dress being the tail of the cowl of an academic hood.

Origins[edit]

The word is believed to originate from the Medieval Latin term liripipium, which is of unsure origin. Webster's Dictionary suggests it is a corruption of cleri ephippium (clergy's "tippet") but this is uncertain. The Oxford English Dictionary, attributing the hypothesis to Gilles Ménage, calls it a "ludicrous guess".

Perhaps due to its academic association, it is also a word used to refer to "part or lesson committed to memory".

Other uses[edit]

The word "liripoop" has also the meaning of "silly person", most probably because it is an inherently funny word, cf. "Nincompoop".[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/mar/29/medieval-graffiti-pictures-lydgate#/?picture=433231755&index=15 The Guardian March 29, 2014, article by Matt Champion, photo from the Norfolk Medieval Graffiti Survey of 2014