Malcolm Miller

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Genova-Tall Ship-IMG 1509.JPG
The Helena C in Genova in August, 2007.
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Name: Malcolm Miller
Builder: John Lewis & Sons, Aberdeen
Yard number: 353
Laid down: 23 March 1967
Launched: 10 October 1967
In service: 10 March 1968
Status: active
General characteristics
Class and type: Private yacht
Displacement: 299 metric tonnes full load
Length: 45.68 m (149.87 ft) sparred
41.15 m (135.01 ft) overall
Beam: 8.31 m (27.26 ft)
Draught: 5.73 m (18.80 ft)
Sail plan: 3-mast bermuda schooner
Malcolm Miller 1991, leaving Aberdeen
The Malcolm Miller on a buoy in Falmouth harbour, August 2009.

The Malcolm Miller is a sistership of the three-mast schooner Sir Winston Churchill designed by Camper & Nicholsons. She was built by John Lewis & Sons in Aberdeen and first served as a Sail training ship before being converted into a yacht.

History[edit]

The Malcolm Miller was built in 1967. Half of the construction cost was donated by Sir James Miller, a former Lord Mayor of London and Lord Provost of Edinburgh. She was named for Sir James' son Malcolm, who had been killed in a car accident.[1] She was used by the Sail Training Association as a sail training ship.

In 2000, the Malcolm Miller was replaced in service by the Stavros S Niarchos. In 2001, the Malcolm Miller was sold and her new owners renamed her Helena C. She was rebuilt and redelivered in 2004 as a private pleasure ship. She crossed the Atlantic ocean on two occasions.

In June 2008 she was damaged by fire while being refurbished, leaving one man with serious burns.[2] In August 2009, the ship was moored to a buoy in Falmouth harbour, mastless and bearing the name Malcolm Miller. In November 2011, she was laid up off Tolverne on the River Fal. In January, 2012, she was towed to Saint Peter Port and then to Gdańsk, to undergo a complete refit at the Conrad shipyard. She was relaunched in 2014.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Malcolm Miller". aberdeenships.com. Retrieved 2008-10-24. 
  2. ^ "Malcolm Miller fire". www.dailyecho.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-08-04. 
  3. ^ http://biznes.trojmiasto.pl/Zaglowiec-Malcolm-Miller-po-remoncie-opuszcza-Gdansk-n85446.html