Malcolm Sinclair

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Malcolm Sinclair
Malcolm Sinclair at the STR Theatre Book Prize ceremony on 18 May 2011 at the Drury Lane Theatre, London.jpg
Born Malcolm Sinclair
(1950-06-05) 5 June 1950 (age 64)
United Kingdom
Occupation Actor
Years active 1984–present

Malcolm Sinclair (born 5 June 1950) is a British stage and television actor. He is perhaps best known for his role as Assistant Chief Constable Freddy Fisher in the television series Pie in the Sky (1994–1997), although he has an extensive number of film, television and theatre roles to his credit. His brother is Keith Sinclair, the Bishop of Birkenhead.[1]

Career[edit]

A former student of the University of Hull and Old Vic Theatre School in Bristol, Sinclair has performed with theatre companies such as the Royal National Theatre and Royal Shakespeare Company. He has performed widely, both in Britain and internationally, in roles that have included Shakespeare (Hamlet, Malvolio), Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, Ibsen and Noël Coward. In 2001 he won the Clarence Derwent Award for his role as Gavin Ryng-Maine in the Royal National Theatre's production of House/Garden. He was also nominated for an Olivier Award as best supporting actor for his performance as Major Miles Flack in Privates on Parade. Recently he has performed in a number of BBC Radio 4 dramatisations of the Agatha Raisin book series alongside Penelope Keith. Penelope Keith stars as Agatha, while Malcolm Sinclair portrays her neighbour James Lacey, who is also an object of Agatha's affection.

Selected credits[edit]

Television credits include:

Film credits include:

Radio credits include:

Stage credits include:

Equity[edit]

In July 2010 Sinclair was elected president of Equity, the actors' and performance professionals' trade union.[8]

Act for Change Project[edit]

In January 2014, after responding to a trailer for a new season of TV drama which failed to include a single BAME artist, the actor Danny Lee Wynter brought together a group of friends and colleagues, Ruth Wilson, Stephanie Street, Daniel Evans, Andy Pryor, Malcolm Sinclair, Kobna Holbrook-Smith, Ony Uhiara, and Matthew Xia, to find a way to inspire change in TV drama. Together they wanted to send out the message that TV drama must reflect everyone regardless of race, gender, class, sexual orientation or disability. What started as a small handful of voices soon became the Act for Change project.[9]

References[edit]

External links[edit]