Manolo (footballer)

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Manolo
Manolo atleti.jpg
Personal information
Full name Manuel Sánchez Delgado
Date of birth (1965-01-17) 17 January 1965 (age 49)
Place of birth Cáceres, Spain
Height 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in)
Playing position Striker
Youth career
Diocesano
Cacereño
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1982–1983 Cacereño
1983–1985 Sabadell 36 (14)
1985–1988 Murcia 107 (29)
1988–1995 Atlético Madrid 219 (76)
1995–1997 Mérida 0 (0)
National team
1982 Spain U16 2 (0)
1982–1983 Spain U18 12 (3)
1987 Spain U23 2 (0)
1988–1992 Spain 28 (9)
Teams managed
2007 Pegaso
2008–2009 Rayo Majadahonda
2010 Cacereño
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).
This name uses Spanish naming customs; the first or paternal family name is Sánchez and the second or maternal family name is Delgado.

Manuel Sánchez Delgado (born 17 January 1965), commonly known as Manolo, is a Spanish retired footballer who played as a striker.

Over the course of ten seasons he amassed La Liga totals of 292 games and 97 goals, namely with Atlético Madrid, with which he won two major titles. He also competed in the category with Real Murcia.

Manolo represented Spain at the 1990 World Cup.

Club career[edit]

Born in Cáceres, Extremadura, Manolo grew up in the ranks of local CP Cacereño, making his senior debuts with the club at the age of 17. After two years with CE Sabadell FC, the last in the second division, he moved to Real Murcia in the same level, helping it promote to La Liga in his first season then scoring 12 goals in 36 games in the following campaign, with the team retaining its top flight status.

In the 1988 summer Manolo joined Atlético Madrid, where he knew his most successful years, forming a formidable offensive partnership with Paulo Futre. With countless assists from the Portuguese, he was crowned top scorer in 1991–92 with 27 goals, adding that season's – and the previous[1]Copa del Rey trophy.

Manolo retired from the game in 1997, after two seasons with CP Mérida (one in the second level) where he failed to appear in any matches due to a serious tibia injury, as he was just three goals shy of 100 in the Spanish top level. In 2007 he started coaching, first with Galáctico Pegaso, going on to spend several seasons in the lower leagues.

International career[edit]

Manolo made his debut for Spain immediately after having been bought by the Colchoneros, appearing and scoring against Republic of Ireland on 16 November 1988 for the 1990 FIFA World Cup qualification stages.[2]

He went on to total 28 caps and nine goals, representing the nation in the finals in Italy where he only appeared in the first group stage game against Uruguay (0–0).[3]

International goals[edit]

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 16 November 1988 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  Republic of Ireland 1–0 2–0 1990 World Cup qualification
2. 8 February 1989 Windsor Park, Belfast, Northern Ireland  Northern Ireland 0–2 0–2 1990 World Cup qualification
3. 23 March 1989 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  Malta 3–0 4–0 1990 World Cup qualification
4. 23 March 1989 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  Malta 4–0 4–0 1990 World Cup qualification
5. 15 November 1989 Sánchez Pizjuán, Seville, Spain  Hungary 1–0 4–0 1990 World Cup qualification
6. 21 February 1990 Rico Pérez, Alicante, Spain  Czechoslovakia 1–0 1–0 Friendly
7. 28 March 1990 La Rosaleda, Málaga, Spain  Austria 1–0 2–3 Friendly
8. 27 March 1991 El Sardinero, Santander, Spain  Hungary 1–1 2–4 Friendly
9. 4 September 1991 Carlos Tartiere, Oviedo, Spain  Uruguay 2–0 2–1 Friendly

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

Atlético Madrid
Murcia

Individual[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "El Mallorca, finalista elemplar" [Mallorca, the perfect finalist] (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 30 June 1991. Retrieved 25 April 2014. 
  2. ^ "2–0: La selección española encandiló al público y terminó entre olés" [2–0: Spanish team dazzled audience and finished with olés] (in Spanish). ABC. 17 November 1988. Retrieved 25 April 2014. 
  3. ^ "¡Muchas gracias, “Príncipe”!" [Thanks a lot, “Prince”!] (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 14 June 2010. Retrieved 2 June 2014. 

External links[edit]