Maritime forest

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Miguel Lillo Park, a maritime forest nature preserve in Necochea, Argentina.

A maritime forest is an ocean coastal wooded habitat found on higher ground than dune areas within range of salt spray.[1] They can be found along the Atlantic and Pacific Northwest coasts of the United States.[2] [3]Also, there are parts of it in areas of South-East Asia, for example Chek Jawa, a wetland reserve which also features a maritime forest as one of the independent ecosystem.

Flora[edit]

High winds, salt spray, and sandy soil provide a harsh environment for plant life. Maritime forests are composed of deciduous, coniferous, and broadleaf evergreens. Some of the trees that occupy maritime forests include the southern sugar maple,[4] swamp dogwood,[4] mockernut hickory,[4] white ash,[5] and the white poplar.[6] Some animals that live in these forests are: foxes, deer, rabbits, tree frogs, raccoons, toads, painted buntings, and many others.

Many plants in the Maritime Forests have a natural waxy coating to protect them from the salt spray. Most of the plants found in Maritime Forests are evergreens and shrubs.

Plants[edit]

Plants that are found on Maritime forests are; Devil's Walking Stick, Saw Palmetto, Sparkle Berry, Spanish Moss, Sweet Gum, Sweet Pittosporum, and many others.

Places[edit]

Some places where Maritime Forests can be found are: Bald Head Island (North Carolina), Jekyll Island (Georgia), and on almost all barrier Islands.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hill, K. (16 July 2002). "Maritime Hammock Habitats". Smithsonian Marine Station. Retrieved 16 October 2009. 
  2. ^ Olson, Donald. "The Pacific Northwest Garden Tour". 
  3. ^ a b c Russell, Alice B. "Trees of the Maritime Forest (A-E)". North Carolina State University. Retrieved 16 October 2009. 
  4. ^ Russell, Alice B. "Trees of the Maritime Forest (F-J)". North Carolina State University. Retrieved 16 October 2009. 
  5. ^ Russell, Alice P. "Trees of the Maritime Forest (P-Z)". North Carolina State University. Retrieved 16 October 2009.