Marty Ruza

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Marty Ruza of "Ruza Creations"/"Elegant Belts" was an American designer of leather fashion accessories who won the Coty Award for jewelry design in 1970. He was described by the fashion journalist Eleanor Lambert as the "leader of the fringed leather and beads school".[1]

Ruza won his Special Coty Award along with five other jewelry designers - Bill Smith, Daniel Stoenescu and Steven Brody at Cadoro, Alexis Kirk, and Cliff Nicholson.[2] For the Coty show, his jewelry, along with matching belts and bags, was showcased in a short film montage by Milton Greene.[3] Whilst his leather goods were described as jewel-like, Ruza's company, Elegant Belts, specialised in belts, bags and headbands rather than focussing on jewelry like the other recipients of the Special award.[1][4] Among Ruza's designs were the "sewing bag tote" designed for women who wanted to carry their needlework around with them,[5] and bags and belts in embroidered vinyl.[6] Elegant Belts was still in business in the early 1980s, with Ruza as its president.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lambert, Eleanor (19 September 1970). "Ethnic Theme Monopolises Front Seat in Fashion". The News and Courier. Retrieved 29 November 2012. 
  2. ^ McDowell, Colin (1984). McDowell's Directory of Twentieth Century Fashion. Frederick Muller. pp. 299–301. ISBN 0-584-11070-7. 
  3. ^ "Bill Blass Named to Hall of Fame". The News and Courier. 29 September 1970. Retrieved 14 December 2012.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  4. ^ Mohr, Berta (25 September 1970). "Mohr about Fashion: Patterns and Prints lead Winning Designs". The Herald Statesman. Retrieved 30 November 2012. 
  5. ^ McCormack, Patricia (5 January 1972). "Embroidery's the Thing for Spring". The Dispatch. Retrieved 30 November 2012. 
  6. ^ O'Sullivan, Joan (20 April 1972). "Stitches in Time". Reading Eagle. Retrieved 30 November 2012. 
  7. ^ "Belt-Tightening Times Good for Belt Makers". Los Angeles Times. 19 November 1982. "Marty Ruza, president of one belt-manufacturing company, says the first six months this year were his best season in years."