Maude Hutchins

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Maude Phelps McVeigh Hutchins (1899 – 28 March 1991) was an American novelist and artist born in New York City, the daughter of Warren Ratcliff McVeigh, an editor at the New York Sun, and Maude Phelps.[1]

Family life[edit]

Maude and her sister were orphaned at a young age and raised by their aunt, a prominent member of Long Island society and by her grandparents in Bayshore on Long Island.[1] She was married in 1921 to Robert Maynard Hutchins who went on to become University of Chicago president.[2]Previous to the UofC presidency, Mr. Hutchins was on the faculty of Yale University and Mrs. Hutchins had enrolled in the Yale School of Fine Arts and completed a five-year degree in 3 1/2 years. They had three children:[3] Mary Frances, Joanna Blessing and Clarissa Phelps, before divorcing in 1948.[1] After her marriage ended, she moved with two of her three daughters to Connecticut, began writing, and published nine novels.

Education[edit]

Maude Hutchins received her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Yale University in 1926.[1]

Artist[edit]

Maude Hutchins became a professional artist in 1924. She had her first art show at the Cosmopolitan Club in New York City. A drawing from her 1932 work, Diagrammatics, which she co-published with Mortimer J. Adler, was enlarged and displayed as a mural in the Hall of Science at the Century of Progress Exhibition in Chicago, Illinois.[1]

Shows and exhibits[edit]

According to a Chicago Sunday Tribune article of June 21, 1942, Maude Phelps Hutchins had shows and exhibits in the following museums and galleries:[1]

Author[edit]

She is considered one of the foremost practitioners of nouveau roman in the English language.[5] Hutchins is best known today for her sexual coming-of-age novel Victorine,[2] which was republished in 2008 by New York Review Books Classics.[6] Other novels include Blood on the Doves and The Unbelievers Downstairs.[7]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Diagrammatics (1932) co-published with Mortimer J. Adler
  • Georgiana (1948)
  • A Diary of Love (1950)
  • Love is a Pie (1952)
  • My Hero (1953)
  • The Memoirs of Maisie (1955)
  • Victorine (1959)
  • The Elevator (1962) (Short story collection)
  • Honey on the Moon (1964)
  • Blood on the Doves (1965)
  • The Unbelievers Downstairs (1967)

Hobbies[edit]

Maude Hutchins was an accomplished amateur pilot.

Death[edit]

Hutchins died in Fairfield, Connecticut on March 28, 1991.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Wendt, Lloyd (June 21, 1942). "The Midway's Versatile First Lady". The Chicago Tribune. 
  2. ^ a b Walker, Andrea (12 August 2008). "In Praise of Wanton Women". The New Yorker. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  3. ^ Dzuback, Mary Ann, Robert M. Hutchins: Portrait of an Educator, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois, 1991
  4. ^ Sturdy, M.F. (2015-05-05). "An Exhibition of Sculpture, Paintings and Drawings by Maude Phelps Hutchins" (Press release). Chicago, Illinois: Albert Roullier Art Galleries. 
  5. ^ Nin, Anais, The Novel of the Future, p. 166, Macmillan, New York, New York, 1968
  6. ^ Castle, Terry. "Victorine". New York Review Books. New York Review Books. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  7. ^ "Books: Short Notices: May 26, 1967". Time. 26 May 1967. Retrieved 16 April 2015.