Membrane roofing

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Membrane roofing is a type of roofing system for buildings and tanks. It is used on flat or nearly flat roofs to prevent leaks and move water off the roof. Membrane roofs are most commonly made from synthetic rubber, thermoplastic (PVC or similar material), or modified bitumen. Membrane roofs are most commonly used in commercial application, though they are becoming increasingly more common in residential application.[1]

Types[edit]

Synthetic Rubber (Thermoset) – This type of membrane roof is made of large, flat pieces of synthetic rubber or similar materials. These pieces are welded together at the seams to form one continuous membrane. The finished roof’s thickness is usually between 30 and 60 mils(thousandths of an inch) (.75mm to 1.5mm). Other types of related materials are CSPE, CR, and ECR.[2]

Thermoplastic Membrane – This is also similar to synthetic rubber, but the seams do not form a continuous membrane. The 'lap' seams are bonded (melted or dissolved) with heat or solvents, and can be as strong as the rest of the membrane. Other related materials are CPA, CPE, EIP, NBP, PIB, and TPO.[2]

Modified Bitumen – This type of roofing is an evolution of asphalt roofing. It is made from asphalt and a variety of modifiers and solvents. There are several ways of connecting pieces of this material. In a heat application process the seams are heated to melt the asphalt together and create a seal. There is also a cold-applied adhesive application process, and some self-adhesive forms of this system. This material is also referred to as APP or SBS.[3]

Advantages Over Asphalt Flat Roofing Systems[edit]

These three application types of membrane roofing show distinct advantages over the previously more common flat roofing method of asphalt and gravel. In asphalt and gravel application, it can be very difficult to create a proper seal at all seams and connection points. This can cause many roofs to leak early in its lifespan, and require much more maintenance. When installed correctly, newer materials are either seamless, or have seams as strong as the body. This eliminates much of the leakage concerns associated with flat roofing systems. Repairs for asphalt and gravel roofs can be hard, mainly because it is difficult to locate the exact point of a leak. Newer systems can be patched relatively easily, and breaks and leaks are easier to locate. Originally asphalt roofing required a layer of gravel above it for two reasons. First, asphalt with direct exposure to sunlight degrades much faster, mainly due to the expansion and contraction throughout a day, and also the damage created by UV rays. Second, asphalt needs weight above to hold it down, because it sits on the top of a building, instead of being attached to it. Each of the three newer types of membrane roofing systems contain materials that resist expansion and contraction, as well as reflect much of the UV rays. Also, because these membranes either lack seams or have strong seams, what expansion and contraction does occur does not create leaks and breaks at these seams. These newer roofing systems are also attached directly to the top of a building, which eliminates the need for excess weight above.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Membrane Roofing For Flat Roofs". Retrieved 2007-04-15. 
  2. ^ a b c "Membrane Roofing Types". Retrieved 2007-04-15. 
  3. ^ "Roof Coatings". Retrieved 2007-04-15.