Mike Lebowitz

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Michael J. Lebowitz (born August 21, 1977 in Cleveland, Ohio) is a Washington, D.C., attorney and expert in the field of military law and Military Expression. Along with being an advocate for veterans' issues, he has published a number of legal articles on First Amendment issues pertaining to the military, as well as the field of national security and war crimes.[1][2][3][4][5][6] In 2009, he became a prosecutor in the Military Commission for the terrorism and war crimes suspects detained in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.[7][8][9][10]

Background[edit]

Lebowitz has a journalism degree from Kent State University (1999) and a law degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Law (2003).[11] In 2005–2006, he served in Iraq as a Pathfinder with the 101st Airborne Division, where he helped capture foreign fighters. [12] After returning from Iraq, he began advocating on behalf of military families and veterans. Lebowitz continues to serve as a JAG officer in the National Guard.

Military law[edit]

Lebowitz is an attorney in the field of military law and specializes in military free speech where he served as defense counsel in a number of cases where uniformed personnel faced discipline for speech-related activities.[13][14] Lebowitz has worked on trials involving military freedom and expression.[15] He lectures on the subject and is asked to serve as a media resource on the impact technology continues to play in the field of military free speech.[16] More recently, he has written on the subject of war crimes and national security, and has served as a war crimes prosecutor at Guantanamo Bay.[2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

Political activities[edit]

Lebowitz is a founder of the Modern Whig Party, an organization originally created in 2008 as an advocacy forum for military families and veterans. This centrist organization professes to offer common-sense approaches to government, rather than ideology.[17] In March 2010, the Modern Whig Party was named by TIME Magazine as among the "top 10 most popular political movements worldwide."[18] Since 2009, upon entering government service, Lebowitz ceased activity with the organization.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Washington Post covering legal issue http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/05/30/AR2007053002627_pf.html
  2. ^ a b Terrorist Speech: Detained Propagandists and the Issue of Extraterritorial Application of the First Amendment https://litigation-essentials.lexisnexis.com/webcd/app?action=DocumentDisplay&crawlid=1&doctype=cite&docid=9+First+Amend.+L.+Rev.+573&srctype=smi&srcid=3B15&key=1bd35066d1029163f2596c5b602da16b
  3. ^ a b Lebowitz, Michael J. (2011). "Anti-war & Anti-Gitmo: Military Expression and the Dilemma of Licensed Professionals in Uniform". Journal of International Law (Case Western Reserve) 43 (3): 579–602. ISSN 0008-7254. OCLC 774260546. 
  4. ^ a b The Cyber-Enemy: Using the Military Justice System to Prosecute Organized Computer Attackers http://illinoisjltp.com/journal/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Lebowitz.pdf
  5. ^ a b Lebowitz, Michael J. (2010). "The Value of Claiming Torture: An Analysis of al Qaeda’s Tactical Lawfare Strategy and Efforts to Fight Back". Journal of International Law (Case Western Reserve) 43 (1-2): 357–393. ISSN 0008-7254. OCLC 775376693. 
  6. ^ a b A Question of Allegiance: Choosing Between Dueling Versions of ‘Aiding the Enemy’ During War Crimes Prosecution http://www.afjag.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-111121-039.pdf
  7. ^ a b Detailing Memorandum United States v. Khalid Sheikh Mohammad, et al http://media.miamiherald.com/smedia/2012/04/17/10/57/1174fl.So.56.pdf
  8. ^ a b About the 9/11 War Crimes Trial http://www.miamiherald.com/2008/02/27/v-fullstory/436366/about-the-911-war-crimes-trial.html
  9. ^ a b CBS News http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-202_162-57536137/navy-to-go-after-rats-mold-in-gitmo-legal-offices/ |url= missing title (help). 
  10. ^ United States v. Nashiri charge sheet http://media.miamiherald.com/smedia/2011/04/20/16/nashiri.source.prod_affiliate.56.pdf
  11. ^ Corps accused of 'muzzle' tactics," by Stephen Koff. Cleveland Plain Dealer, May 31, 2007
  12. ^ Facebook Face-Off, Military Times http://www.militarytimes.com/article/20091208/OFFDUTY02/912080302/Facebook-face-off
  13. ^ "Zip it, Soldier!" Mother Jones
  14. ^ "Antiwar to the Corps: Marine Reservist-Protesters Face Discipline", by David Montgomery. Washington Post May 31, 2007; Page C01.
  15. ^ http://www.militarytimes.com/article/20091208/OFFDUTY02/912080302/Facebook-face-off
  16. ^ "The Rise and Fall of a Military Blogger", Army Times
  17. ^ KRMS News-Talk 1150 Morning Magazine interview, February 6, 2009
  18. ^ Silver, Alexandra (2010-03-29). "The Modern Whig Party - Top 10 Alternative Political Movements". TIME. Retrieved 2012-07-22.