Newport State Airport (Vermont)

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Coordinates: 44°53′20″N 072°13′45″W / 44.88889°N 72.22917°W / 44.88889; -72.22917

Newport State Airport
IATA: EFKICAO: KEFKFAA LID: EFK
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner State of Vermont
Serves Newport, Vermont
Elevation AMSL 930 ft / 283 m
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
5/23 4,000 1,219 Asphalt
18/36 4,000 1,219 Asphalt
Statistics (2008)
Aircraft operations 8,784
Based aircraft 20

Newport State Airport (IATA: EFKICAO: KEFKFAA LID: EFK) is a public airport located three miles (5 km) southwest of the central business district of Newport, a city in Orleans County, Vermont, United States. It is owned by the State of Vermont.[1]

Facilities and aircraft[edit]

Newport State Airport covers an area of 540 acres (220 ha) which contains two asphalt paved runways (5/23 and 18/36), each measuring 4,000 x 100 ft (1,219 x 30 m).[1]

For the 12-month period ending August 18, 1997, the airport had 7,140 aircraft operations, an average of 19 per day: 97% general aviation and 3% military. There are 17 aircraft based at this airport: 88% single engine and 12% multi-engine.[1]

History[edit]

Until the 1970s, Newport city owned the airport. They sold it to the state of Vermont.[2]

On August 14 - August 15, 2004 the airport served as the site of Coventry, the former final live concert appearance by the musical group Phish, attended by tens of thousands of fans.[3][4]

On January 9, 2012 the state announced its intention to seek Federal approval for an expansion. The project, projected to take 9 years would extend the runway by 1,000 to 5,000 feet (300 to 1,520 m) with the capability of handling private jets. Other improvements include expanded water and sewer services, a new terminal, new taxiways, and services from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Transportation Security Administration. [5][6]

In 2013, Flight Design announced the intention of assembling CTLS planes at the airport from nine pieces, fabricated in Germany. It would employ about 35 workers.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Master Record for EFK (Form 5010 PDF), effective 2007-07-05
  2. ^ Wright, Duane (September 2009). "Up, Up and Away with Cecil Wright and His Flying Machines". vermont's Northland Journal 8 (6): 8. 
  3. ^ BurlingtonFreePress.com - PHISH // Photo Gallery
  4. ^ Nude as the News: Phish:
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ D'Ambrosio, Dan (July 12, 2013). "Bringing 'aviation vacation' to the Kingdom". The Burlington Free Press (Burlington, Vermont). pp. 3B. Retrieved July 13, 2013. 

External links[edit]