Night Key

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Night Key
Nightkeyposter.jpg
Directed by Lloyd Corrigan
Produced by Robert Pressnel (associate producer)
Written by Tristram Tupper
John C. Moffitt
William Pierce (original story)
Starring Boris Karloff
Warren Hull
Jean Rogers
Music by Louis Forbes (musical director)
Cinematography George Robinson (photographer)
John P. Fulton (special effects)
Edited by Otis Garrett
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates
April 18, 1937 (New York City)[1]
May 2, 1937 (USA)[2]
August 16, 1937 (Los Angeles)[1]
Running time
67 minutes[2]
Country  United States
Language English
Budget $192,000+[1][2]

Night Key is a science fiction crime film starring Boris Karloff and released by Universal Pictures in 1937.[1][2]

Plot[edit]

The inventor of a burglar alarm (Karloff) attempts to get back at the man who stole the profits to his invention (Hinds) before he goes blind. The device is then subverted by gangsters (Baxter, et. al.) who apply pressure to the inventor and use his device to facilitate burglaries.

Production[edit]

Filming began on January 18th, 1937 with a budget of $175,000. Filming ended on either February 16th or February 20th, 6 days over schedule and $17,000 over budget.[1][2]

Cast[edit]

Trivia[edit]

  • This was the last film in which Karloff was billed with only his last name, a Universal Pictures policy during his career height.
  • A scene from this movie is shown on a TV screen in the movie The Ice Storm.
  • Although not a horror film, this film is part of the Shock Theater package of classic horror films.

Home Video Release[edit]

This film, along with Tower of London, The Climax, The Strange Door and The Black Castle, was released on DVD in 2006 by Universal Studios as part of The Boris Karloff Collection.

This DVD set contains the rerelease version of this film from Realart Pictures, Inc.. It also contains the rerelease version of the theatrical trailer

The packaging for this DVD set erroneously indicates that this film has a running time of 78 minutes.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Stephen Jacobs, Boris Karloff: More Than a Monster, Tomahawk Press, 2011 pp. 209-212
  2. ^ a b c d e Tom Weaver, Michael Brunas and John Brunas, Universal Horrors: The Studio's Classic Films, 1931-46 Second Edition, McFarland, 2007 pp. 170-175

External links[edit]