Noonan, North Dakota

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Noonan, North Dakota
City
The Travelers Hotel in Noonan
The Travelers Hotel in Noonan
Location of Noonan, North Dakota
Location of Noonan, North Dakota
Coordinates: 48°53′18″N 103°0′34″W / 48.88833°N 103.00944°W / 48.88833; -103.00944Coordinates: 48°53′18″N 103°0′34″W / 48.88833°N 103.00944°W / 48.88833; -103.00944
Country United States
State North Dakota
County Divide
Area[1]
 • Total 0.31 sq mi (0.80 km2)
 • Land 0.30 sq mi (0.78 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation 1,972 ft (601 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 121
 • Estimate (2013[3]) 123
 • Density 403.3/sq mi (155.7/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 58765
Area code(s) 701
FIPS code 38-57220
GNIS feature ID 1030422[4]

Noonan is a city in Divide County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 121 at the 2010 census.[5]

Noonan was founded in 1907 and named after a family that had business, farm, and coal interests in the area. It was once known as "The White City" because of an ordinance requiring all buildings to be painted white.[6]

Geography[edit]

Noonan is located at 48°53′18″N 103°0′34″W / 48.88833°N 103.00944°W / 48.88833; -103.00944 (48.888466, -103.009404).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.31 square miles (0.80 km2), of which, 0.30 square miles (0.78 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 153
1920 376 145.8%
1930 423 12.5%
1940 520 22.9%
1950 551 6.0%
1960 625 13.4%
1970 403 −35.5%
1980 283 −29.8%
1990 231 −18.4%
2000 154 −33.3%
2010 121 −21.4%
Est. 2013 123 1.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
2013 Estimate[9]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 121 people, 67 households, and 32 families residing in the city. The population density was 403.3 inhabitants per square mile (155.7 /km2). There were 107 housing units at an average density of 356.7 per square mile (137.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.9% White, 1.7% Native American, 1.7% Asian, and 0.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.8% of the population.

There were 67 households of which 13.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.8% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 52.2% were non-families. 46.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.81 and the average family size was 2.53.

The median age in the city was 50.4 years. 13.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 19% were from 25 to 44; 37.2% were from 45 to 64; and 22.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 52.9% male and 47.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 154 people, 76 households, and 30 families residing in the city. The population density was 563.6 people per square mile (220.2/km²). There were 116 housing units at an average density of 424.6 per square mile (165.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 100.00% White.

There were 76 households out of which 14.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.2% were married couples living together, 1.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 60.5% were non-families. 53.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 30.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.74 and the average family size was 2.70.

In the city the population was spread out with 11.0% under the age of 18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 20.1% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 39.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 58 years. For every 100 females there were 100.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $20,000, and the median income for a family was $46,250. Males had a median income of $27,500 versus $13,333 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,065. About 7.1% of families and 14.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under the age of eighteen and 24.4% of those sixty five or over.

Climate[edit]

This climatic region is typified by large seasonal temperature differences, with warm to hot (and often humid) summers and cold (sometimes severely cold) winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Noonan has a humid continental climate, abbreviated "Dfb" on climate maps.[10]

Dump site[edit]

In March 2014, news reports indicated that the town included an illegal dump of radioactive mining waste. An abandoned gas station was found to contain hundreds of "filter socks ... used to capture the solids in flowback water during hydraulic fracturing", which trap radioactive debris.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-14. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-14. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-06-02. 
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2 May 2011. 
  6. ^ Wick, Douglas A. "Noonan (Divide County)". North Dakota Place Names. Retrieved 9 May 2011. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  8. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved September 7, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". Retrieved June 2, 2014. 
  10. ^ Climate Summary for Noonan, North Dakota
  11. ^ Donovan, Lauren (2014-03-13). "Radioactive dump site found in abandoned building in remote N.D. town". Bismarck Tribune via the Billings Gazette. Retrieved 2014-03-15.