North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer

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North Carolina Tar Heels
women's soccer
North Carolina Tar Heelswomen's soccer athletic logo

University University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Conference ACC
Location Chapel Hill, NC
Head Coach Anson Dorrance (29th year)
Stadium Fetzer Field
(Capacity: 6,000)
Nickname Tar Heels
Colors Carolina Blue and White

             

Home
Away
NCAA Tournament Champions
1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012
NCAA Tournament Runner Up
1985, 1998, 2001
NCAA Tournament Semifinal
1995, 2002
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 [1]
Conference Tournament Champions
1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009
Conference Regular Season Champions
1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008
North Carolina Tar Heels celebrate winning the 2006 Women's College Cup.

The North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I soccer.[2] The team has won 20 of the 22 Atlantic Coast Conference championships, and 21 of the 31 NCAA national championships.

History[edit]

The UNC women's soccer team began as a club team established by students looking for high level competition. In 1977, they petitioned the UNC Athletic Director, Bill Cobey, to take the club to the varsity level. Cobey asked Anson Dorrance, then the UNC men's soccer coach to assess the club's ability to transition to varsity status. Dorrance was impressed by the team, then coached by Mike Byers to recommend the school form a women's soccer team. Cobey agreed and hired Dorrance as head coach, with Byers as an assistant, for the 1978 season. That year, the Tar Heels played an essentially club schedule, including games against high school teams. However, in 1979, the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, at the prompting of Dorrance and University of Colorado coach, Chris Lidstone, established a national women's soccer program.[3] At the time, UNC had the only varsity women's soccer team in the Southeast and this allowed Dorrance to recruit the top talent in the region. In 1981, he recruited one of the most talented freshman squads in the history of women's soccer. Eight of those recruits won starting positions and took the team to the first, and only, AIAW national championship. This group would set the tone for Tar Heels soccer for down through its history. As Dorrance recalls it, "These were the true pioneers. They were given nothing. They were accustomed to taking things and so they weren't as genteel as the sort of young ladies we can recruit now. . . They were the sort of girls who would go downtown, burn it to the ground, . . . But then, they were on time for every single practice and in practice they worked themselves until they were bleeding and throwing up. They had a tremendous commitment to victory and to personal athletic excellence. And for that I admired them because they were a tremendous group. And even though, off the field, I think they all hated each other. But once the game began, there was a collective fury that just intimidated everyone they played against."[4] Building on that competitive drive, the Tar Heels went on to win the first three NCAA championships, and dominate the sport for years to come.

All-Time Record[edit]

  Year   Head Coach   Overall   ACC   ACC Tournament     NCAA Tournament  
1979   Anson Dorrance   10–2–0
1980 21–5–0 AIAW Semifinals
1981 23–0–0 AIAW Champions
1982 19–2–0 Champions
1983 19–1–0 Champions
1984 24–0–1 Champions
1985 18–2–1 Runner Up
1986 24–0–1 Champions
1987 23–0–1 3–0–0 Champions
1988 18–0–3 1–0–1 Runner Up Champions
1989 24–0–1 4–0–0 Champions Champions
1990 20–1–1 4–0–0 Champions Champions
1991 24–0–0 4–0–0 Champions Champions
1992 25–0–0 4–0–0 Champions Champions
1993 23–0–0 4–0–0 Champions Champions
1994 25–1–1 5–1–0 Champions Champions
1995 25–1–0 7–0–0 Champions Semifinals
1996 25–1–0 7–0–0 Champions Champions
1997 27–0–1 7–0–0 Champions Champions
1998 25–1–0 7–0–0 Champions Runner Up
1999 24–2–0 7–0–0 Champions Champions
2000 21–3–0 4–3–0 Champions Champions
2001 24–1–0 7–0–0 Champions Runner Up
2002 21–2–4 4–1–2 Champions Semifinals
2003 27–0–0 7–0–0 Champions Champions
2004 20–1–2 9–0–0 Runner Up Third Round
2005 23–1–1 9–1–0 Champions Quarterfinals
2006 27–1–0 10–0–0 Champions Champions
2007 19–4–1 9–1–0 Champions Third Round
2008 25–1–2 9–0–1 Champions Champions
2009 23–3–1 9–3–0 Champions Champions
2010 19–3–2 9–3–0 Semifinals Third Round
2011 13–5–2 6–3–1 Quarterfinals Third Round
2012 15–5–3 6–3–1 Quarterfinals Champions
2013 20–5–0 10–3–0 Semifinals Quarterfinals

Individual honors[edit]

National Coach of the Year:

ACC Coach of the Year:

Hermann Trophy:

ACC Player of the Year:

ACC Defensive Player of the Year:

ACC Offensive Player of the Year:

ACC Rookie of the Year:

NCAA Tournament MVP:

Offensive Player of the NCAA Tournament:

Defensive Player of the Tournament:

First Team All America Selection: As of 2011, North Carolina had 70 players gain first-team All American recognition. The next two schools with the greatest number of All Americans were tied with twenty-two each.[5]

References[edit]

External links[edit]