Order of the Million Elephants and the White Parasol

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Order of the Million Elephants and the White Parasol
Itsariyaphon Lan Sang Hom Khao
Orde van de Miljoen Olifanten en de Witte Parasol van Laos.jpg
Awarded by the King of Laos
Status Extinct as the Kingdom
Sovereign Sisavang Vong
Savang Vatthana
Grades (w/ post-nominals) Collar
Grand Cordon
Grand Officer
Commander
Officer
Knight
Established 1 May 1909
Last induction 1975
Precedence
Next (higher) None; highest.
Next (lower) Order of the Crown
LAO Order of the a Million Elephants and the White Parasol - Knight BAR.png
Ribbon of the Order

The Order of the Million Elephants and the White Parasol, also called the Order of the Million Elephants and the White Umbrella, was the highest knighthood order of the Kingdom of Laos.

History[edit]

The Order was founded on 1 May 1909 by King Sisavang Vong.[1]

The name of the order reflected an old name of Laos, Lan Sang, the first words of a longer term which is translated as "the realm of a million elephants and the white umbrella".[2]

No awards were made after the Kingdom of Laos came to an end.

Classes[edit]

The Order consisted of the following classes, in ascending order :

  • Collar
  • Officer
  • Commander
  • Grand Cross
  • Grand Officer
  • Knight
Ribbon bars
LAO Order of the a Million Elephants and the White Parasol - Grand Cross BAR.png
Collar
LAO Order of the a Million Elephants and the White Parasol - Grand Cross BAR.png
Grand Cross
LAO Order of the a Million Elephants and the White Parasol - Grand Officer BAR.png
Grand Officer
LAO Order of the a Million Elephants and the White Parasol - Commander BAR.png
Commander
LAO Order of the a Million Elephants and the White Parasol - Officer BAR.png
Officer
LAO Order of the a Million Elephants and the White Parasol - Knight BAR.png
Knight

Insignia[edit]

The ribbon on which the Order was worn is red, ornamented with a yellow geometrical design.

Notable recipients[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Illustrated London News, vol. 138 (1911), part 1, p. 138
  2. ^ Bijan Raj Chatterjee, Southeast Asia in Transition (1965), p. 18