Paraffin

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Paraffin hydrocarbon, also called alkane, any of the saturated hydrocarbons having the general formula CnH2n+2, C being a carbon atom, H a hydrogen atom, and n an integer. The paraffins are major constituents of natural gas and petroleum. Paraffins containing fewer than 5 carbon atoms per molecule are usually gaseous at room temperature, those having 5 to 15 carbon atoms are usually liquids, and the straight-chain paraffins having more than 15 carbon atoms per molecule are solids. Branched-chain paraffins have a much higher octane number rating than straight-chain paraffins and, therefore, are the more desirable constituents of gasoline. The hydrocarbons are immiscible with water but are soluble in absolute alcohol, ether, and acetone. All paraffins are colourless.

Chemicals[edit]

  • Paraffin wax, a white or colourless soft solid that is used as a lubricant and for other applications
  • Alkane, a saturated hydrocarbon
  • Kerosene, a fuel that is also known as paraffin
  • Tractor vaporising oil, a fuel
  • Liquid paraffin (medicinal), a very highly refined mineral oil used in cosmetics and for medical purposes
  • Mineral oil, any of various colorless, odorless, light mixtures of alkanes in the C15 to C40 range from a non-vegetable (mineral) source, particularly a distillate of petroleum
  • Petroleum jelly, also called soft paraffin

Other uses[edit]

See also[edit]