Peter Dubovský

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Peter Dubovský
Personal information
Full name Peter Dubovský
Date of birth (1972-05-07)7 May 1972
Place of birth Bratislava, Czechoslovakia
Date of death 23 June 2000(2000-06-23) (aged 28)
Place of death Ko Samui, Thailand
Height 1.79 m (5 ft 10 12 in)
Playing position Forward
Youth career
1982–1985 FKM Vinohrady
1985–1989 Slovan Bratislava
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1989–1993 Slovan Bratislava 94 (59)
1993–1995 Real Madrid 31 (2)
1995–2000 Oviedo 120 (17)
Total 245 (78)
National team
1991–1993 Czechoslovakia 14 (6)
1994–2000 Slovakia 33 (12)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Peter Dubovský (7 May 1972 – 23 June 2000) was a Slovak footballer who played as a forward.

After starting his career with Slovan Bratislava he played seven years in Spain, amassing La Liga totals of 151 games and 19 goals for two teams.

Dubovský died in 2000 at only 28, while on vacation in Thailand.

Club career[edit]

Born in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia, Dubovský made his professional debuts with local ŠK Slovan Bratislava, for whom he signed at the age of 13. Only four years later he made his first Czechoslovak First League appearance, and went on to score 51 goals in only 59 appearances in his last two seasons combined (leading the scoring charts on both occasions),[1] being an instrumental offensive figure as his hometown club won the national championship in 1992.

After being named the Slovak Footballer of the Year in 1993, Dubovský moved to Spain and signed for La Liga giants Real Madrid. He appeared in 26 games in his first season but was completely ostracized by new manager Jorge Valdano in his second and last, his options being further diminished at the club following the emergence of 17-year-old Raúl.[2][3]

Dubovský remained in the country – and its top division – in the following five years, playing for Real Oviedo and scoring a career-best in Spain seven goals in 31 matches in the 1995–96 campaign,[4][5] helping the Asturians to the 14th position.

International career[edit]

Dubovský made his debut for Czechoslovakia on 13 November 1991 at the age of 19, starting in a 1–2 away loss against Spain for the UEFA Euro 1992 qualifiers. He went on to appear in a further 13 internationals in the following two years, scoring six goals.

After the independence of Slovakia, Dubovský represented its national team, eventually becoming the country's record goalscorer at 12 (until it was broken by Szilárd Németh).[6]

International goals[edit]

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
. 29 March 1995 Všešportový areál, Košice, Slovakia  Azerbaijan 3–0 4–1 Euro 1996 qualifying

Honours[edit]

Team[edit]

Individual[edit]

Death[edit]

On 23 June 2000, Dubovský was on vacation in Thailand with his fiancée, in the southern resort of Ko Samui. While taking pictures of a waterfall, he tumbled and fell to his death, succumbing to "heavy loss of blood and severe brain injuries".[7] He was only 28 years old.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jeřábek, Luboš (2007). Český a československý fotbal – lexikon osobností a klubů (in Czech). Prague, Czech Republic: Grada Publishing. p. 232. ISBN 978-80-247-1656-5. 
  2. ^ "Peter Dubovsky critica a Jorge Valdano y anuncia que quiere irse del Madrid" [Peter Dubovsky criticizes Jorge Valdano and announces he wants to leave Madrid] (in Spanish). El País. 30 November 1994. Retrieved 23 January 2014. 
  3. ^ ""Lo que necesito es jugar"" ["What i need is to play"] (in Spanish). El País. 10 April 1995. Retrieved 23 January 2014. 
  4. ^ "Dubovsky llega a un acuerdo con el Oviedo" [Dubovsky reaches agreement with Oviedo] (in Spanish). El País. 25 July 1995. Retrieved 23 January 2014. 
  5. ^ "Resolvió la zurda de Dubovsky" [Dubovsky's left the decider] (in Spanish). El País. 6 November 1995. Retrieved 23 January 2014. 
  6. ^ Klukowski, Tomasz (21 April 2003). "Peter Dubovský – International Goals". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 April 2011. 
  7. ^ Italy's Lazio eyes Argentine striker Crespo; Sports Illustrated, 23 June 2000

External links[edit]