Pythons 2

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For Python 2.0 programming language, see Python (programming language). For Python-2 missile, see Python (missile).
Pythons 2
Python II FilmPoster.jpeg
Directed by Lee McConnell[1]
Produced by Jeffrey Breach[1]
Phillip Roth[1]
Written by Jeff Rank[1]
Starring William Zabka
Dana Ashbrook
Alex Jolig
Simmone Jade Mackinnon
Music by Rich McHugh[1]
Cinematography Azusa Ohno[1]
Editing by David Flores
Production company UFO/Unified Film Organization and Python Productions
Country United States
Language English
Original channel Sci Fi Channel
Release date
  • July 17, 2002 (2002-07-17)
Running time 90 minutes

Pythons 2,[1] released on home media as Python II and sometimes listed in references as Python 2[2]), is a science-fiction/horror film released as a Sci Fi Pictures television film on the Sci Fi Channel. A 2002 sequel to the 2000 film Python, it stars Billy Zabka, reprising his role as Greg Larson from the first film, Dana Ashbrook and Simmone Jade Mackinnon. Directed by Lee McConnell, it was produced by Jeffery Beach and Phillip Roth for UFO/Unified Film Organization and Python Productions.

Plot[edit]

One of a pair of giant bioengineered pythons with acidic venom and armor-like skin, created by a Russian and American joint military operation led by U.S. Army Colonel Robert Evans Jefferson, Jr. (Marcus Aurelius), escapes into Russia's Ural Mountains. Jefferson and his team go to retrieve it, and find disaster in a clandestine Russian military base where the creature slaughters soldiers and scientists alike.

American Dwight Stoddard (Dana Ashbrook) and his Russian wife Nalia (Simmone Jade Mackinnon) run a shipping business in Russia. Greg Larson (Billy Zabka, reprising his Python role) hires them to move some mysterious container, and they reach the isolated and deserted Russian military base. Larson's primary concern is retrieving the snakes' DNA, and he begins to kill his own men in the attempt before being killed himself by one snake. Nalia leads one snake through a land mine field while the other one is blown up by an explosive hurled into the snake's mouth by Dwight. Only Dwight and Nalia survive, and are rescued by Russian soldiers.

Cast[edit]

Source:[1]

  • William Zabka as Greg Larson
  • Dana Ashbrook as Dwight Stoddard
  • Alex Jolig as Matthew Coe
  • Simmone Jade Mackinnon as Nalia
  • Marcus Aurelius as Col. Robert Evans Jefferson, Jr.
  • Mihail Miltchev as Hewitt
  • Vladimir Kolev as Charley
  • Kiril Efremov as Boyce
  • Raicho Vasilev as Dirc
  • Vadko Dimitrov as McKuen
  • Anthony Nichols as Kristopher
  • Velizar Binev as Aziz
  • Tyron Pinkham as Pilot
  • Sgt. Robert Sands as Co-pilot
  • Maxim Genchy as Old soldier
  • Hristo Shopov as The Doctor
  • Ivailo Geraskov as Col. Zubov
  • Ivan Burney as Russian soldier 1
  • Georgi Ivanov as Russian soldier 2
  • Ivan Panez as Scientist 1
  • Stanislav Dimitrov as Scientist 2
  • Robert Zachar as Father
  • Bojka Velkova as Mother
  • Kiril Hristov as Spencer
  • Uncredited actor as Vladi
  • Uncredited actor as Sgt. Ivan Petrov

Production[edit]

It was filmed in Sofia, Bulgaria.[citation needed] The visual effects supervisor was Alvaro Villagomez, the character animation supervisor as Yancy Calzada, and the digital effects supervisor was Florentino Calzada.[1]

Reception[edit]

The DVD & Video Guide 2005 describes the movie as beginning "on a boring note and goes downhill from there".[3] Doug Pratt states that Zabka's performance appears as if "he had sat through too many Emillio Esteves films"[4] and calls the cinematography of the DVD transfer "grainy".[4] The Videohound's Golden Movie Retriever 2005 gave the film its lowest rating on a 5 point scale.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Pythons 2". Official site (Sci Fi Channel). Archived from the original on February 12, 2003. 
  2. ^ rottentomatoes.com
  3. ^ DVD & video guide 2005 by Mick Martin, Marsha Porter
  4. ^ a b Doug Pratt's DVD: Movies, Television, Music, Art, Adult, and More! Doublas Pratt
  5. ^ Videohound's Golden Movie Retriever 2005 Jim Craddock. The score is a "woof!", on a scale that is either 1-4 "bones" or "woof!"

External links[edit]