Richard Mott

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For the mathematician and statistician, see Richard Mott (statistician).
Richard Mott
Richard Mott.jpg
circa 1872
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 5th district
In office
March 4, 1855 – March 3, 1859
Preceded by Alfred Edgerton
Succeeded by James Mitchell Ashley
6th Mayor of Toledo, Ohio
In office
1845–1846
Preceded by George B. Way
Succeeded by Emery D. Potter
Personal details
Born (1804-07-21)July 21, 1804
Mamaroneck, New York
Died January 22, 1888(1888-01-22) (aged 83)
Toledo, Ohio
Resting place Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester, New York
Political party Opposition, Republican
Signature

Richard Mott (July 21, 1804 – January 22, 1888) was mayor of Toledo, Ohio, and a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Biography[edit]

Born to Quaker parents in Mamaroneck, New York, Mott attended a Quaker boarding school and seminary in Dutchess County, New York. In 1815, he moved with his parents to New York City, in 1818 became a clerk in a store, and in 1824 engaged in banking. He moved to Toledo, Ohio, in 1836 and engaged in the real estate business and other enterprises. He assisted in building the first railroad west of Utica, from Toledo to Adrian, and served as mayor of Toledo in 1845 and 1846.

Mott was a Democrat in politics until 1848, when he entered actively into the antislavery movement. He was elected as an Opposition Party candidate to the Thirty-fourth and reelected as a Republican to the Thirty-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1855 - March 3, 1859). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1858. He returned to Toledo, and engaged in banking and the real estate business. He served as chairman of the citizens' military committee during the Civil War. Mott was also an advocate of woman suffrage.

He died in Toledo on January 22, 1888. He was interred in Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester, New York.

Family[edit]

He was the brother of James Mott and brother-in-law of the American female agitator, Lucretia Mott and brother-in-law to abolitionist Lindley Murray Moore.

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

Attribution