Right to quote

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Right to quote is a legal concept in continental Europe, which some people consider similar to fair use.[1] It allows for quoting excerpts of copyrighted works, as long as the cited paragraphs are within a reasonable limit (varying from country to country), clearly marked as quotations and fully referenced, and if the resulting new work is not just a collection of quotations, but constitutes a fully original work in itself. In some countries the intended use of the work (educational, scientific, parodist, etc.) may also be a factor determining the scope of this right.

France[edit]

In France, it is illegal to reproduce someone's work without their approval. But if the work is published, i.e. no longer being edited prior to release, small quotations are legal.[2]

Germany[edit]

In Germany, the right to quote is extended considerably for research purposes and may even encompass complete works (e. g. texts, pictures, music or videos).[3]

Poland[edit]

In Poland, the right to quote allows quotation of excerpts of works and small works as a whole, provided that this is justified by teaching, review or the specificity of the works genre (eg. parody).[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://lists.debian.org/debian-legal/2005/02/msg00221.html
  2. ^ http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:JsLouMmYHV0J:www.ibls.com/members/docview.aspx%3Fdoc%3D963+Right+to+quote&cd=7&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ch
  3. ^ § 51 UrhG German legislation on the Großzitat
  4. ^ http://techlaw.pl/prawo-cytatu/

See also[edit]