Robin Klein

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Robin Klein
Born 28 February 1936 (1936-02-28) (age 78)
Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Genres Children's and young adult fiction
Notable work(s) Hating Alison Ashley, Came Back to Show You I Could Fly

Robin McMaugh Klein is an Australian author of books for children. She was born 28 February 1936, in Kempsey, New South Wales and now resides near Melbourne.

Early life[edit]

Robin Klein was one of nine children.[1] She had her first short story published at the age of sixteen. She worked in number of jobs before becoming an established writer, such as tea lady at a warehouse, as a bookshop assistant, a nurse, copper enamelist, and program aide at a school for disadvantaged children.[2] In 1981 she was awarded a Literature Board grant for writing and since then she has had more than twenty books published.

Career[edit]

Several of her books have been short-listed for the CBCA Children's Book of the Year Award, including Hating Alison Ashley (also a film starring Delta Goodrem) and Halfway Across the Galaxy and Turn Left (filmed as a television series for the Seven Network in 1992). Klein's novel Came Back to Show You I Could Fly won a Human Rights Award for Literature in 1989 and also won the 1990 CBCA Children's Book of the Year Award: Older Readers. It was filmed as Say a Little Prayer in 1993.

Several of her other books have received awards in Australia, including the South Australian Festival Award for Literature, which she won in 1998 with The Listmaker. Many others including Boss of the Pool have also won or been short listed.

Robin Klein suffered an aneurysm rupture, and, while she survived, as of 2005 she lives in a nursing home and is no longer able to write or do significant publicity work for her books.

Awards[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Collections[edit]

  • Ratbags and Rascals : Funny Stories (J.M. Dent, 1984), illustrated by Alison Lester
  • Snakes and Ladders : poems about the ups and downs of life (J.M. Dent, 1985), illustrated by Ann James
  • Tearaways (Viking, 1990, first published as Stories to Make You Think Twice)
  • All in the Blue Unclouded Weather (Viking, c1991)

Penny Pollard books[edit]

illustrated by Ann James

  1. Penny Pollard's Diary (Oxford University Press, 1983)
  2. Penny Pollard's Letters (Oxford University Press, 1984)
  3. Penny Pollard in Print (Oxford University Press, 1986)
  4. Penny Pollard's Passport (Oxford University Press, 1988)
  5. Penny Pollard's Guide to Modern Manners (Oxford University Press, 1989)
  6. Penny Pollard's Scrapbook (Hodder Children's Books Australia, 1999)

Thing books[edit]

  1. Thing (Oxford University Press, 1982) illustrated by Alison Lester
  2. Thingnapped! (Oxford University Press, 1984)
  3. Thing Finds a Job (Hodder Headline, 1996), illustrated by Alison Lester
  4. Thing's Concert (Hodder Healine, 1996), illustrated by Alison Lester
  5. Thing's Birthday (Hodder Headline, 1996), illustrated by Alison Lester
  6. Thingitis (Hodder Headline, 1996), illustrated by Alison Lester

Miscellaneous[edit]

  • The Giraffe in Pepperell Street (Hodder and Stoughton, 1978), illustrated by Gill Tomblin
  • Junk Castle (Oxford University Press, 1983), illustrated by Rolf Heimann
  • People Might Hear You (Puffin Books, 1983)
  • Oodoolay (Era Publications, c1983), illustrated by Vivienne Goodman
  • Brock and the Dragon (Hodder & Stoughton, 1984), illustrated by Rodney McRae
  • Hating Alison Ashley (Puffin Books, 1984)
  • Thalia, the Failure (Ashton Scholastic, 1984), illustrated by Rhyll Plant
  • The Enemies (Angus & Robertson, 1985), illustrated by Noela Young
  • Halfway Across the Galaxy and Turn Left (Viking Kestrel, 1985)
  • Serve Him Right! (Edward Arnold (Australia), 1985), illustrated by John Burge
  • You're on Your Own! (Edward Arnold, 1985)
  • Good For Something (Edward Arnold Australia, 1985)
  • Separate Places (Roo Books, 1985), illustrated by Astra Lacis
  • Games (Viking Kestrel, 1986), illustrated by Melissa Webb
  • Boss of the Pool (Omnibus in association with Penguin, 1986)
  • The Princess who Hated It (Omnibus Books, 1986), illustrated by Maire Smith
  • Robin Klein's Crookbook (Methuen Australia, 1987), illustrated by Kristen Hilliard
  • Don't Tell Lucy (Methuen Australia, 1987)
  • Birk, the Berserker (Omnibus Books, 1987), illustrated by Alison Lester
  • The Lonely Hearts Club (Oxford University Press, 1987), with Max Dann
  • I Shot an Arrow (Viking Kestrel, 1987), illustrated by Geoff Hocking
  • Christmas (Methuen, c1987), illustrated by Kristen Hilliard
  • Laurie Loved Me Best (Viking Kestrel, 1988)
  • Jane's Mansion (Shortland, 1988), illustrated by Melissa Webb
  • The Kidnapping of Clarissa Montgomery (Shortland, 1988), illustrated by Jane Wallace-Mitchell
  • Against the Odds (Puffin Books, 1989), illustrated by Bill Wood
  • Honoured Guest (Angus & Robertson, 1989)
  • Came Back to Show You I Could Fly (Viking Penguin, 1989)
  • The Ghost in Abigail Terrace (Omnibus Books, 1989), illustrated by Margaret Power
  • Boris and Borsch (Allen & Unwin, 1990), illustrated by Cathy Wilcox
  • Dresses of Red and Gold (Viking, 1992)
  • Amy's Bed (Omnibus Books, 1992), illustrated by Coral Tulloch
  • Seeing Things (Penguin Books Australia, 1993)
  • Turn Right for Zyrgon (Puffin, 1994)
  • The Sky in Silver Lace (Penguin, 1995)
  • The Listmaker (Viking, 1997)
  • Barney's Blues (Puffin, 1998), illustrated by David Cox
  • The Goddess (Lothian, 1998), illustrated by Anne Spudvilas
  • Gabby's Fair (Omnibus Books, 1998), illustrated by Michael Johnson
  • Anything Happens

Adaptations[edit]

Television[edit]

Stage[edit]

  • Hating Alison Ashley: The Play, adapted by Richard Tulloch
  • Boss of the Pool, adapted by Mary Morris

Film[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Robin Klein. IMDb.com
  2. ^ Robin Klein (1936–) Biography – Personal, Addresses, Career, Honors Awards, Writings, Adaptations, Sidelights – Australia, Illustrated, Books, and Review – JRank Articles. Biography.jrank.org. Retrieved on 2012-05-13.
  3. ^ "CYSS [NSW] Nancy Booker Honour Lecture 2000 by Margaret Hamilton". ALIA Children's and Youth Services (NSW). Retrieved 2007-08-11. 
  4. ^ "1989 Human Rights Medal and Awards". Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Commission. Retrieved 2007-08-11. 

References[edit]

External links[edit]