Ronald Duman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Ronald S. Duman is a Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology Director, Division of Molecular Psychiatry and Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities at Yale University.[1]

Education[edit]

Duman received his Ph.D. in 1985 from the The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Career[edit]

Ron Duman's research centers around the biological mechanisms behind antidepressants. In his landmark 1995 paper, he discovered that antidepressants increase the gene expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, or (BDNF)[2] in the hippocampus. In a later paper he discovered that the downstream effect of BDNF is to increase neurogenesis or the formation of new neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus) .[3]

The results of this work led him to formulate the hypothesis that depression is caused by a decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis caused by elevated cortisol levels.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Duman's Yale Faculty Website Archived 18 December 2010 at WebCite
  2. ^ First paper demonstrating the link between antidepressants and BDNF levels Archived 18 December 2010 at WebCite
  3. ^ Abstract of paper demonstrating that antidepressants increase neurogenesis Archived 18 December 2010 at WebCite