Ryōsen-ji (Nara)

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Ryōsen-ji
Ryosenji Nara Japan16n.jpg
Ryōsen-ji Hondō (1283), a National Treasure
Information
Mountain Name Mountain Tomi (登美山)
Mountain Bikō (鼻高山)
Denomination Ryōsen-ji Shingon Buddhism
Venerated Yakushi Nyorai
Founded 736
Founding priest Gyōki, Bodhisena
Address 3879 Nakamachi, Nara
631-0052
Country Japan
Coordinates 34°40′24″N 135°44′33″E / 34.673448°N 135.742401°E / 34.673448; 135.742401Coordinates: 34°40′24″N 135°44′33″E / 34.673448°N 135.742401°E / 34.673448; 135.742401
Website Ryōsen-ji

Ryōsen-ji (霊山寺?) is a Buddhist temple in Nara, Japan. Founded in the eighth century, the Hondō is a National Treasure and a number of other buildings and temple treasures have been designated Important Cultural Properties.

History[edit]

Pagoda

In the late seventh century Ono no Tobito erected a set of public baths on Mount Tomi outside Nara and enshrined an image of Yakushi. In 734 Emperor Shōmu instructed Gyōki to erect a hall on the site, and two years later the Indian monk Bodhisena, noticing a resemblance to the Vulture Peak, founded the Ryōsen-ji. The Hondō was rebuilt in 1283. Toyotomi Hideyoshi granted the temple lands valued at a hundred koku. In the Meiji period many of the monk's quarters were abandoned and over two hundred images were burned. Restored in 1940, the temple has been revived.[1]

Buildings[edit]

Treasures[edit]

Jūrokusho Jinja[edit]

Jūrokusho Jinja (十六所神社?) is now an independent shrine, but before the Meiji period served Ryōsen-ji in a tutelary capacity.[25] The Honden (1384) and subordinate Sumiyoshi Jinja Honden and Ryūō Jinja Honden (both 1386) have been designated Important Cultural Properties.[26][27][28]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Founding and History of the Temple". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  2. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  3. ^ "Hondō". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  4. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  5. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  6. ^ "Sanjūnotō". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  7. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  8. ^ "Shōrō". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  9. ^ "Wall painting inside the three-storey pagoda". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  10. ^ "Yakushi Nyorai". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  11. ^ "Nikkō & Gakkō Bosatsu". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  12. ^ "Zushi". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  13. ^ "Jūni Shinshō". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  14. ^ "Buddha triad". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  15. ^ "Yakushi Nyorai". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  16. ^ "Dainichi Nyorai". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  17. ^ "Jūichimen Kannon". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  18. ^ "Bishamonten". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  19. ^ "Jikokuten & Bishamonten". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  20. ^ "Jizō Bosatsu". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  21. ^ "Yakushi triad". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  22. ^ "Pendant disc". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  23. ^ "Gyōki Bosatsu". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  24. ^ "Bodhisena". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  25. ^ "Jūrokusho Jinja". Ryōsenji. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  26. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  27. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 
  28. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 20 April 2011. 

External links[edit]