Saccharolipid

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Chemical structure of lipid A as found in E. Coli[1]

Saccharolipids describe compounds in which fatty acids are linked directly to a sugar backbone, forming structures that are compatible with membrane bilayers. In the saccharolipids, a monosaccharide substitutes for the glycerol backbone present in glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids. The most familiar saccharolipids are the acylated glucosamine precursors of the lipid A component of the lipopolysaccharides in Gram-negative bacteria. Typical lipid A molecules are disaccharides of glucosamine, which are derivatized with as many as seven fatty-acyl chains. The minimal lipopolysaccharide required for growth in E. coli is Kdo2-Lipid A, a hexa-acylated disaccharide of glucosamine that is glycosylated with two 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) residues.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Raetz, Christian R. H.; Guan, Ziqiang; Ingram, Brian O.; Six, David A.; Song, Feng; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Zhao, Jinshi (2009). "Discovery of new biosynthetic pathways: the lipid A story". Journal of Lipid Research: S103–S108. 
  2. ^ Raetz CR, Garrett TA, Reynolds CM, Shaw WA, Moore JD, Smith DC Jr, Ribeiro AA, Murphy RC,Ulevitch RJ, Fearns C, Reichart D, Glass CK, Benner C, Subramaniam S, Harkewicz R, Bowers-Gentry RC, Buczynski MW, Cooper JA, Deems RA, Dennis EA (2006). "Kdo2-Lipid A of Escherichia coli, a defined endotoxin that activates macrophages via TLR-4". Journal of Lipid Research 47 (5): 1097–1111. doi:10.1194/jlr.M600027-JLR200. PMID 16479018.