Samuel Weems

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Samuel A. Weems (December 12, 1936 – January 25, 2003) was the writer of the book Armenia: The Secrets of a "Christian" Terrorist State and a disbarred[1][2][3] Arkansas lawyer from Hazen, Arkansas. He was disbarred while holding the office of prosecuting attorney for mixing his clients' money with his own. A year later he was convicted of arson and conspiring to defraud an insurance firm, but wasn't immediately removed from the office, despite the disbarment decision.[1] He died of a heart attack on January 25, 2003. He was best known for his advocacy of, and contribution to, the denial of the Armenian Genocide.[4] He unsuccessfully ran for the position of mayor of the very small town of Hazen in 1994 and 1998.[5]

He made various controversial remarks such as "the Armenians have never been known as truth tellers" and "the number one export of Armenia is terrorism". Weems' book Armenia: The Secrets of a "Christian" Terrorist State was condemned by the Armenian Assembly of America as "outrageous and racist anti-Armenian propaganda.[6] In March 2002 Weems visited Turkey on the occasion of the 81st anniversary of the assassination of Talat Paşa and, in numerous interviews with news agencies as well as in the universities of Istanbul and Ankara, spoke on the "Armenian issue" and alleged a smear campaign against Turkey in Europe and the United States, He also made arrangements about the printing of his book in Turkish.[4] He appeares in Sari Gelin, a documentary denying the Armenian Genocide that was sponsored by the Ankara Chamber of Commerce. His second book, about the Armenische Legion, was almost complete and ready for printing before he died.[4]

Weems was survived by his Turkish wife, Gülnur, and a son.[4]

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