Sara Douglass

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For the English actress, see Sarah Douglas.
Sara Douglass
Born Sara Warneke
(1957-06-02)2 June 1957
Penola, South Australia, Australia
Died 27 September 2011(2011-09-27) (aged 54)
Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Pen name Sara Douglass
Nationality Australian
Period 1995–2011
Genres Fantasy
Notable award(s) Aurealis Award
Fantasy division
1996 Enchanter & StarMan
2001 The Wounded Hawk

www.saradouglass.com

Sara Warneke (2 June 1957 – 27 September 2011), better known by her pen name Sara Douglass, was an Australian fantasy writer who lived in Hobart, Tasmania.

Biography[edit]

A great-granddaughter of psychic Robert James Lees, Douglass was born in Penola, South Australia. She attended Annesley College, in Wayville, a suburb of Adelaide. She studied for her BA while working as a registered nurse, and later completed her PhD in early modern English History. She became a lecturer in medieval history at La Trobe University, Bendigo. While there she completed her first novel, BattleAxe, which launched her as a popular fantasy author in Australia, and later as an international success.

Until the mid-2000s, Douglass hosted a bulletin board on her website, with the aim of encouraging creative thinking and constructive criticism of others' work. She maintained an online blog about the restoration project of her house and garden entitled Notes from Nonsuch in Tasmania.[1]

In 2008, Douglass was diagnosed with ovarian cancer.[2] She underwent treatment, but in late 2010 the cancer returned.[3] She died on 27 September 2011, aged 54.[4]

Works[edit]

Fantasy fiction[edit]

Douglass mainly focused her efforts on fantasy writings. Her first trilogy, The Axis Trilogy, is set in the fantasy world of Tencendor. Of The Axis Trilogy, Enchanter and StarMan won the 1996 Aurealis Fantasy division award[5] and Battleaxe was nominated for the 1995 award.[6] Douglass's second series, The Wayfarer Redemption, two stand alone novels and her most recent series, Darkglass Mountain also focus on the fantasy world used in The Axis Trilogy. The Wayfarer Redemption also did well in the Aurealis Fantasy division with all three novels reaching the finals for their published years.[7][8][9]

In addition to the fantasy novels set in the world of Tencendor and Escator, Douglass wrote two unrelated historical fantasy series, The Crucible trilogy and The Troy Game. Some of these novels also reached the Aurealis Fantasy division finals with The Nameless Day and The Crippled Angel from The Crucible finishing as finalists[10][11] and The Wounded Hawk winning the award in 2001.[12] Hades' Daughter and Darkwitch Rising from The Troy Game also were finalists in the Fantasy division.[11][13]

Other works[edit]

Douglass also wrote a non-fiction book, The Betrayal of Arthur, and several short stories.

Bibliography[edit]

Note: In the USA, and most European countries, The Axis Trilogy and The Wayfarer Redemption have been combined into one six-book series, Wayfarer Redemption.

The Axis Trilogy[edit]

Main article: The Axis trilogy

The Wayfarer Redemption[edit]

The Crucible[edit]

Main article: The Crucible

The Troy Game[edit]

Main article: The Troy Game

Darkglass Mountain[edit]

  • The Serpent Bride (2007)
  • The Twisted Citadel (2008)
  • The Infinity Gate (2010)

Other[edit]

Short stories[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

  • Images of the Educational Traveller in Early Modern England (E. J. Brill, 1995)
  • The Betrayal of Arthur (1998)

Awards and nominations[edit]

Aurealis Awards[edit]

Main article: Aurealis Awards

Fantasy division

  • Finalist: Battleaxe (1995)
  • Won: Enchanter and Starman (1996) tie with Jack Dann's The Memory Cathedral
  • Finalist: Sinner (1997)
  • Finalist: Pilgrim (1998)
  • Finalist: Crusader (1999)
  • Finalist: The Nameless Day (2000)
  • Won: The Wounded Hawk (2001)
  • Finalist: The Crippled Angel (2002)
  • Finalist: Hades' Daughter (2002)
  • Finalist: Darkwitch Rising (2005)

Australian Shadows Award[edit]

  • Finalist: "This Way to the Exit" (Dreaming Again, ed. Jack Dann, HarperVoyager 2008)[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Notes from Nonsuch in Tasmania"
  2. ^ Australian fantasy writer Sara Douglass dies of ovarian cancer
  3. ^ Douglass' writings about dying
  4. ^ Chapman, Jennifer (27 September 2011). "Australian fantasy writer Sara Douglass dies of ovarian cancer". heraldsun.com.au. Retrieved 27 September 2011. 
  5. ^ "1996 Aurealis Awards". The Locus Index to SF Awards. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  6. ^ "1995 Aurealis Awards". The Locus Index to SF Awards. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  7. ^ "1997 Aurealis Awards". The Locus Index to SF Awards. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  8. ^ "1998 Aurealis Awards". The Locus Index to SF Awards. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  9. ^ "1999 Aurealis Awards". The Locus Index to SF Awards. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  10. ^ "2000 Aurealis Awards". The Locus Index to SF Awards. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  11. ^ a b "2003 Aurealis Awards". The Locus Index to SF Awards. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  12. ^ "2001 Aurealis Awards". The Locus Index to SF Awards. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  13. ^ "2005 Aurealis Awards". The Locus Index to SF Awards. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
  14. ^ "2008 Australian Shadows Award". Australian Horror Writers Association. 2008-02-13. Retrieved 2009-02-14. 

External links[edit]