Sayed Kashua

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Sayed Kashua (Arabic: سيد قشوع, Hebrew: סייד קשוע; b. 1975) is an Israeli Arab author and journalist born in Tira, Israel, known for his books and humoristic columns in Hebrew.

Biography[edit]

Sayed Kashua was born in Tira in the Triangle region of Israel. In 1990, he was accepted to a prestigious boarding school in Jerusalem - Israel Arts and Science Academy.[1] He studied sociology and philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Kashua was a resident of Beit Safafa before moving to a Jewish neighborhood of Jerusalem with his wife and children.[2]

Literary career[edit]

Kashua writes satirical columns in Hebrew for Haaretz newspaper[3] and a local Jerusalem weekly, HaIr. In a humorous, tongue-in-cheek style,[4] Kashua addresses the problems faced by Arabs in Israel, caught between two worlds.[5]

Television[edit]

Avoda Aravit, or in English, Arab Labor, is a satirical sitcom written by Kashua and aired on Israel's Channel 2. A large part of the dialogue is in Arabic with Hebrew subtitles. The show is about a young Arab couple, Amjad (Norman Issa) and Bushra (Clara Khoury), and their young daughter, who live in an Arab village on the outskirts of Jerusalem. Amjad is a journalist working for a Hebrew newspaper (much like Haaretz) who desperately seeks to assimilate into the prevailing Israeli Jewish cultural milieu with mixed and hilarious results.[1] The show holds a mirror up to the racism and ignorance on both sides of the ethnic divide and has been compared with All in the Family.

Awards and prizes[edit]

Published works[edit]

  • Dancing Arabs (2002)
  • Let it be Morning (2006)
  • Second Person Singular (2010) (also published as Exposure (2013))

Documentaries[edit]

A 2009 documentary film produced by Dorit Zimbalist, Sayed Kashua — Forever Scared, documents the upheavals and events that changed Kashua's life over a period of seven years.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kershner, Isabel (2008-01-07). "Straddling Cultures, Irreverently, in Life and Art — New York Times". Israel: Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2011-07-19. 
  2. ^ Atlantic Books: Sayed Kashua
  3. ^ <http://www.haaretz.com/misc/writers/sayed-kashua-1.567>
  4. ^ <http://www.haaretz.com/weekend/sayed-kashua/.premium-1.532304>
  5. ^ "Boston Review — lalami.php". Bostonreview.net. Retrieved 2011-07-19. [dead link]
  6. ^ Sayed Kashua[dead link] on The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature website
  7. ^ "Award winners". webcache.googleusercontent.com. [dead link]
  8. ^ פרס ברנשטיין לסייד קשוע [The Bernstein Prize to Sayed Kashua] (in Hebrew), ישראל היום, July 19, 2011, p. 31 

External links[edit]