Scott Gordon

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For other people named Scott Gordon, see Scott Gordon (disambiguation).
Scott Gordon
Born (1963-02-06) February 6, 1963 (age 51)
Brockton, MA, USA
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Goaltender
Caught Left
Played for Fredericton Express (AHL)
Baltimore Skipjacks (AHL)
Halifax Citadels (AHL)
Johnstown Chiefs (ECHL)
Quebec Nordiques (NHL)
New Haven Nighthawks (AHL)
Nashville Knights (ECHL)
Atlanta Knights (IHL)
Knoxville Cherokees (ECHL)
National team  United States
NHL Draft Undrafted
Playing career 1986–1994

Scott M. Gordon (born February 6, 1963) is an American-born professional hockey coach and former professional hockey goaltender. For three years (2011-14), he was an assistant coach with the Toronto Maple Leafs of the National Hockey League and he was previously the head coach of the American Hockey League's Providence Bruins and the National Hockey League's New York Islanders.

College[edit]

Boston College (1982–1986)[edit]

Gordon began his collegiate career with the Boston College Eagles in the 1982–83 season, where in nine games, Gordon posted a 3–3–0 record with a 2.43 GAA.

Gordon became the Eagles starting goaltender in 1983–84, where in 35 games, he had a 21–13–0 record and a 3.74 GAA, helping Boston College qualify for the 1984 NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Tournament. The Eagles faced off against the Michigan State Spartans, where they lost the two-game total goal series 13–8.

He retained his starters job for the 1984–85 season, as Gordon went 23–11–2 with a 3.61 GAA in 36 games played. On March 16, 1985, in a game against the Providence College Friars, Gordon and Friars goaltender Chris Terreri made hockey history, as both goalies placed water bottles on the top of their nets. This was the first time ever that goales placed water bottles on the top of their nets in a hockey game.[1] Gordon led Boston College into the 1985 NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Tournament, as the Eagles reached the semi-finals before losing to Providence College 4–3 in triple overtime.

Gordon returned for one last season with Boston College in 1985–86, where in 32 games, he posted a 17–8–1 record and a 3.63 GAA. Boston College qualified for the 1986 NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Tournament, however, they lost to the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers 11–7 in the East Regional semi-finals.

Professional career[edit]

Quebec Nordiques (1986–1992)[edit]

Gordon was not drafted, and on October 2, 1986, he signed as a free agent with the Quebec Nordiques. The Nordiques assigned Gordon to the Fredericton Express of the AHL for the 1986–87 season. In 31 games, Gordon had a 10–12–2 record with a 4.47 GAA and .875 save percentage, as the Express failed to qualify for the playoffs.

In the 1987–88 season, the Nordiques assigned Gordon to the Baltimore Skipjacks of the AHL, and in 34 games, Gordon posted a 7–18–3 record with a 5.61 GAA and .861 save percentage. His seven wins led the Skipjacks, as Baltimore finished in last place in the league, missing the playoffs.

Gordon spent most of the 1988–89 season with the Johnstown Chiefs of the ECHL. In 31 games, Gordon had a record of 18–9–3 with a 3.82 GAA and a .888 save percentage, as Johnstown finished in second place in the league. In the post-season, Gordon went 7–4 with a 3.34 GAA in eleven games, as the Chiefs lost to the Carolina Thunderbirds in the Riley Cup finals. Gordon also saw some action with the Halifax Citadels of the AHL during the 1988–89 season, going 0–2–0 with a 5.17 GAA and a .825 save percentage in two games.

Gordon played most of the 1989–90 with the Nordiques AHL affiliate, the Halifax Citadels, where in 48 games, Gordon had a 28–16–3 record with a 3.33 GAA and a .887 save percentage, leading Halifax into the playoffs. In six playoff games, Gordon had a 2–4 record with a 4.94 GAA as the Citadels lost to the Sherbrooke Canadiens in the North Division semi-finals.

Gordon also made his NHL debut in the 1989–90 season with the Quebec Nordiques. He played his first game on January 30, 1990, as he took the loss in a 5–2 defeat against the Buffalo Sabres. After losing his first four games in the NHL, Gordon recorded his first victory, as on February 6, 1990, he made 26 saves in a 5–3 victory over the Vancouver Canucks. Overall, Gordon was 2–8–0 with a 5.33 GAA and .856 save percentage in ten games for the Nordiques. Gordon also became the first ever former ECHL player to appear in the NHL.[2]

He began the 1990–91 season with the Nordiques, where in 13 games, Gordon had a record of 0–8–0 with a 5.94 GAA and .787 save percentage with Quebec. He spent the majority of the 1990–91 season with the Citadels, as Gordon posted a 12–10–2 record with a 3.70 GAA and .879 save percentage for Halifax, however, the club failed to reach the post-season.

Gordon split the 1991–92 season between the Halifax Citadels, where in seven games, he had a 3–3–1 record with a 3.82 GAA and .886 save percentage, and the New Haven Nighthawks, where Gordon was 3–1–0 with a 2.76 GAA and .898 save percentage in four games. In two playoff games with the Nighthawks, Gordon 0–2 with a 4.54 GAA as the Nighthawks lost to the Adirondack Red Wings in the North Division semi-finals. Following the season, Gordon became a free agent and signed with the Nashville Knights of the ECHL.

Nashville Knights (1992–1993)[edit]

Gordon spent the 1992–93 season with the Nashville Knights of the ECHL. In 23 games, Gordon had a 13–9–1 record with a 4.30 GAA and .889 save percentage, helping Nashville qualify for the playoffs. In nine playoff games, Gordon had a 5–4 record with a 4.38 GAA as the Knights lost to the Toledo Storm in the semi-finals.

Knoxville Cherokees (1993–1994)[edit]

Gordon began the 1993–94 season with the Knoxville Cherokees of the ECHL, as in 26 games, he posted a 15–10–1 record and a .874 save percentage. He left the team late in the season to join the Atlanta Knights of the IHL.

Atlanta Knights (1994)[edit]

Gordon joined the Atlanta Knights late in the 1993–94, where in five games, he had a record of 0–1–3 with a 3.35 GAA and .888 save percentage. Gordon did not see any action in the post-season, as the Knights won the Turner Cup, defeating the Fort Wayne Komets in the finals.

At the end of the season, Gordon announced his retirement, and joined the Knights coaching staff.

International career[edit]

Gordon represented the United States during his international career. He appeared in the 1991 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships held in Finland, where in two games, he was 0–1–0 with a 7.50 GAA, as the USA finished in fourth place.

Gordon spent most of the 1991–92 season playing for the USA National team, where in 29 games, he went 13–12–3 with a 4.03 GAA. Gordon also appeared in one game at the 1992 Winter Olympics held in Albertville, France, where he had a 0-0-0 record with a 7.06 GAA in 17 minutes of play, as the USA finished in fourth place.

Coaching[edit]

Atlanta Knights (1994–1996)[edit]

Gordon became an assistant coach with the Atlanta Knights of the IHL for the 1994–95 season under Knights head coach John Paris Jr.. Atlanta finished the season with a 39–37–5 record, earning 83 points for third place in the Central Division, and a trip to the playoffs. In the first round of the post-season, the Knights lost to the Las Vegas Thunder in five games.

In the 1995–96 season, Gordon remained with the Knights, however, midway through the season, the club fired Paris, but retained Gordon. Atlanta finished the season with a 32–41–9 record, earning 73 points, and fourth place in the Central Division. The Knights qualified for the playoffs, but were swept by the Cincinnati Cyclones in the first round.

After the season, the Knights moved from Atlanta to Quebec City, and became the Quebec Rafales.

Quebec Rafales (1996–1998)[edit]

Gordon remained an assistant coach with the team through the franchise relocation, as the club hired Jean Pronovost as their head coach for the 1996–97 season. The Rafales had a solid season, going 41–30–11, earning 93 points and fourth place in the North Division. Quebec swept the Cincinnati Cyclones in the first round of the playoffs, however, they lost to the Detroit Vipers in the Turner Cup quarter-finals.

The Rafales struggled in the 1997–98 season, failing to reach the playoffs with a 27–48–7 record, earning 61 points. After the season, the club folded.

Roanoke Express (1998–2000)[edit]

Gordon joined the Roanoke Express of the ECHL as the head coach of the team for the 1998–99 season. In his first season with the team, Gordon led them to a 38–22–10 record, earning 86 points, and first place in the Northeast Division. In the post-season, Roanoke defeated the Dayton Bombers and Chesapeake Icebreakers to reach the North Conference finals, however, they were swept by the Richmond Renegades.

Gordon led the Express to another first place finish in the North Division in the 1999–2000 season, going 44–20–6, registering 94 points. In the post-season, the Express were upset by the Johnstown Chiefs in the first round. After the season, Roanoke did not renew Gordon's contract.

Providence Bruins (2000–2008)[edit]

Gordon joined the Providence Bruins of the AHL as an assistant coach to Bill Armstrong for the 2000–01 season. In his first season with the Bruins, the team had a 35–31–10–4 record, earning 84 points and a trip to the playoffs, as the club finished in third place in the New England Division. Providence defeated the Hartford Wolf Pack and Worcester IceCats to win the division in the playoffs, however, the Bruins lost to the Saint John Flames in the Eastern Conference finals.

In 2001–02, the Bruins struggled to a 35–33–8–4 record, third in the East Division, and tenth in the Eastern Conference. Providence faced the St. John's Maple Leafs in a best-of-three qualifying series, in which they were swept in two games to be eliminated from the playoffs.

The Bruins made a head coaching change prior to the 2002–03, as Mike Sullivan was hired to take over for Bill Armstrong. Providence kept Gordon as an assistant coach. After the Bruins started the season 41–17–9–4 under Sullivan, he was promoted to the Boston Bruins late in the season as the team made a coaching change, and Gordon became the head coach of Providence. Gordon led Providence to a 3–3–2–1 record in their last nine games, as the club finished in first place in the North Division. In the post-season, the Bruins were upset by the Manitoba Moose in the first round.

Gordon led Providence to a 36–29–11–4 record in his first full season as the head coach in 2003–04, helping them reach the qualifying round of the playoffs. In the best-of-three qualification round, the Bruins were swept by the Portland Pirates in two games.

Providence had a solid season in 2004–05, going 40–30–7–3 to finish with 90 points, and a fourth place finish in the Atlantic Division. The Bruins then upset the first place Manchester Monarchs in the first round of the playoffs, then defeated the Lowell Lock Monsters in the Atlantic Division finals to earn a trip to the Eastern Conference finals. The Bruins lost to the Philadelphia Phantoms in six games.

Gordon led the Bruins to another post-season appearance in the 2005–06 season, as Providence had a 43–31–1–5 record, earning 92 points and fourth place in the Atlantic Division. In the playoffs, the Portland Pirates defeated Providence in the first round.

The Bruins had another very solid season in 2006–07, as Providence had a 44–30–2–4 record, earning 94 points and third place in the Atlantic Division. The Bruins defeated the Hartford Wolf Pack in the Division semi-finals, however, they lost to the Manchester Monarchs in the Atlantic Division finals.

Providence had a spectacular season in 2007–08, as the Bruins won the Macgregor Kilpatrick Trophy, awarded to the team who finished with the most points in the regular season. The Bruins had a 55–18–3–4 record, earning 117 points. Providence quickly swept the Manchester Monarchs in the first round of the playoffs, but the Bruins were upset by the Portland Pirates in the Atlantic Division finals. After the season, Gordon won the Louis A.R. Pieri Memorial Award as Coach of the Year in the AHL.

On August 12, 2008, Gordon left the Bruins, as he became the head coach of the New York Islanders in the NHL.[3]

New York Islanders (2008–2011)[edit]

Gordon made his NHL head coaching debut on October 10, 2008, as the New York Islanders lost to the New Jersey Devils 2–1. Gordon earned his first NHL victory the next night, on October 11, 2008, as the Islanders defeated the St. Louis Blues 5–2 in his first home game. The Islanders struggled throughout the season, finishing 26–47–9, earning 61 points and last place in the Atlantic Division, missing the playoffs.

In 2009–10, the Islanders improved to a 34–37–11 record, getting 79 points, but missed the playoffs once again.

The Islanders once again struggled at the start of the 2010–11, as the club had a record of 4–10–3 in their first 17 games to quickly fall out of the playoff picture. On November 15, 2010, the Islanders fired Gordon, replacing him with Jack Capuano. He was given a job as special advisor to general manager Garth Snow following his dismissal as head coach.[4][5]

Toronto Maple Leafs (2011-2014)[edit]

On June 20, 2011, the Toronto Maple Leafs hired Gordon as an assistant coach under head coach Ron Wilson. Late in the 2011–12 season, the Maple Leafs fired Wilson as head coach, hiring Randy Carlyle as his replacement, and keeping Gordon on as an assistant. He was fired after the 2013-14 season.

International career[edit]

On April 8, 2009, Gordon was named an assistant coach to Ron Wilson for the United States at the 2009 IIHF World Championship held in Switzerland by USA general manager Brian Burke. The USA finished in fourth place in the tournament.[6]

Gordon joined Wilson and Burke once again as an assistant coach for the USA at the 2010 Winter Olympics held in Vancouver, British Columbia, helping the United States to the silver medal.

Gordon was the head coach of the United States at the 2011 IIHF World Championship held in Slovakia. The USA struggled and finished in eighth place in the tournament.[7]

Coaching record[edit]

NHL coaching record[edit]

Team Year Regular Season Post Season
Won Lost OT/SO Win % Finish Won Lost Result
NYI 2008-09 26 47 9 .356 5th in Atlantic Division - - Failed to Qualify
NYI 2009-10 34 37 11 .478 5th in Atlantic Division - - Failed to Qualify
NYI 2010-11 4 10 3 .285 5th in Atlantic Division - - Fired Mid-Season
Total 64 94 23 .405 0 Division
Championships
0 0 0 Stanley Cups

Minor leagues[edit]

Team Year Regular Season Post Season
G W L T OTL Pts Finish Result
ROA 1998–99 70 38 22 10 86 1st in Northeast Lost in Kelly Cup Finals
ECHL Totals 70 38 22 10 86 0 Division Titles 1 Playoff Appearance
PRO 2002–03 9 3 3 2 1 104 1st in North Lost in First round
PRO 2003–04 80 36 29 11 4 87 4th in Atlantic Lost in Qualifying
PRO 2004–05 80 40 30 7 3 90 4th in Atlantic Lost in Third round
PRO 2005–06 80 43 31 6 92 4th in Atlantic Lost in First round
PRO 2006–07 80 44 30 6 94 3rd in Atlantic Lost in Second round
PRO 2007–08 80 55 18 7 117 1st in Atlantic Lost in Second round
AHL Totals 409 221 141 20 27 584 2 Division Titles 5 Playoff Appearances

Awards and honors[edit]

Award Year
All-Hockey East First Team 1985–86
  • 1988–89: All-ECHL Team

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hockey’s Book of Firsts, p.12, James Duplacey, JG Press, ISBN 978-1-57215-037-9
  2. ^ "Brunette Becomes First ECHL Alum To Play In 1000 NHL Games". ECHL.com. February 2, 2011. Retrieved February 7, 2011. 
  3. ^ TSN.ca. "Islanders name Scott Gordon as new head coach". Retrieved August 12, 2008. 
  4. ^ Kimelman, Adam (November 15, 2010). "Struggling Islanders dismiss Gordon as coach". NHL.com. 
  5. ^ "Jack Capuano Named Interim Head Coach of the Islanders". NewYorkIslanders.com. November 15, 2010. Retrieved November 15, 2010. 
  6. ^ NHL.com. "USA Hockey names Gordon assistant coach". 
  7. ^ http://www.iihf.com/sk/home-of-hockey/championships/news-singleview-championchips/article/gordon-to-coach-us.html?tx_ttnews%5BbackPid%5D=314&cHash=e52663e9b7

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Ted Nolan
Head coach of the New York Islanders
200810
Succeeded by
Jack Capuano
Preceded by
Mike Sullivan
Head coach of the Providence Bruins
2003–08
Succeeded by
Rob Murray