Silsbee, Texas

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Silsbee, Texas.
City
Location of Silsbee, Texas
Location of Silsbee, Texas
Hardin County Silsbee.svg
Coordinates: 30°20′53″N 94°10′49″W / 30.34806°N 94.18028°W / 30.34806; -94.18028Coordinates: 30°20′53″N 94°10′49″W / 30.34806°N 94.18028°W / 30.34806; -94.18028
Country United States
State Texas
County Hardin
Area
 • Total 7.5 sq mi (19.5 km2)
 • Land 7.5 sq mi (19.5 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 82 ft (25 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 6,611
 • Density 881.5/sq mi (352.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 77656
Area code(s) 409
FIPS code 48-67832[1]
GNIS feature ID 1347123[2]

Silsbee is a city in Hardin County, Texas, United States. It is located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 96 and State Highway 327. The population was 6,611 at the 2010 census. It is part of the BeaumontPort Arthur Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[edit]

Silsbee is located at 30°20′53″N 94°10′49″W / 30.34806°N 94.18028°W / 30.34806; -94.18028 (30.348095, -94.180220)[3].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.5 square miles (19 km2), all land.

Historical development[edit]

Silsbee was first referred to as Mill Town when the site was first reached by the Gulf, Beaumont, and Kansas City Railway in 1894. The town was renamed in recognition of Nathaniel Silsbee, an investor from Boston, Massachusetts who helped provide funds for the railway.[4] The railroad was a project of John Henry Kirby who would soon establish the Kirby Lumber Company in the city. This business would be the main employer and strength of the Silsbee economy from the city’s beginning.[5]

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2010, there were 6,611 people, 2,520 households, and 1,763 families residing in the city. The population density was 881.5 people per square mile (327.8/km²). There were 2,790 housing units at an average density of 353.5 per square mile (136.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 65.8% White, 30.3% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 0.015% Pacific Islander, 1.4% from other races, and 01.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.0% of the population.

There were 2,520 households out of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.1% were married couples living together, 18.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.0% were non-families. 10.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 19 to 24, 23.1% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 17.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34.7 years. Of the entire population 45.9% were male and 54.1% were female. Of those individuals age 18 and over 32.5% were male and 67.5% were female.

The median income for a household in the city was $49,121, and the median income for a family was $51,518. Approximately 16.6% of the population were below the poverty line. 14.0% of families were below the poverty line, while only 3.9% of married families were in poverty. Of those age 65 or over, 4.4% were below the poverty line.

Education[edit]

The City of Silsbee is served by the Silsbee Independent School District, with a total of 5 schools — The John Henry Kirby Elementary School (Pre K-1), The Read-Turrentine Elementary School (2-3), The Laura Reeves Elementary (4-5), The Edwards-Johnson Memorial Silsbee Middle School (6-8), and Silsbee High School.

Controversy[edit]

Silsbee High School and the school district were criticized for expelling a cheerleader from the school's cheerleading squad because of her refusal to cheer for a basketball player who pled guilty to raping her. The charges were dropped down to assault a year later and he was given probation.

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in November 2010 that the victim — who is known only as H.S. — had no right to refuse to applaud her attacker because as a cheerleader in uniform, she was an agent of the school. The Fifth Circuit dismissed her case as "frivolous" and sanctioned the girl, ordering her family to pay the school district's $45,000 legal fees.[7][8][9] The Supreme Court declined to review the case. As of June, 2011, Change.org and Ms. Magazine were promoting a proposal by journalist Scott Rose calling for individuals to send the district superintendent one penny each, accompanied by notes protesting the district's decision if it did not waive its right to payment.[10][11]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ Handbook of Texas Online, Handbook of Texas Online, accessed May 5, 2007
  5. ^ Houstonian founds Silsbee because of natural resources, access May 5, 2007
  6. ^ "American Factfinder". US Census Department. Retrieved 2012-10-28. 
  7. ^ Heldman, Caroline (October 15, 2010). "Cheerleader Required to Cheer for Man Who Assaulted Her". Ms Magazine blog. Retrieved November 26, 2010. 
  8. ^ Heller, Matthew (September 29, 2010). "Court's Ruling in Failure-to-Cheer Case Deserves Boos". On Point News. Retrieved November 26, 2010. 
  9. ^ Roberts, Selena (November 8, 2010). "High School Dissonance". Sports Illustrated 113 (17). Retrieved November 26, 2010. 
  10. ^ Scott Rose. "A challenge to the superintendent in the Texas cheerleader assault case," May 7, 2011.
  11. ^ Change.org. "Tell Silsbee HS: don't make victim pay $35,000 for refusal to cheer rapist."

External links[edit]