Spermatorrhea

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For a type of spontaneous orgasm involving ejaculation during sleep, see Nocturnal emission.

Spermatorrhea is a condition of excessive, accidental ejaculation.

It is a recognized disorder in Traditional Chinese Medicine, in which certain patterns of involuntary ejaculation reflect problems with kidney qi.[1][2]

In Ayurvedic Medicine, Ashwagandha and Bala are used to treat this vata ailment.[3]

In the 18th and 19th centuries, if a patient had ejaculations outside of marital intercourse, or released more semen than is typical, then he was diagnosed with a disease called spermatorrhea or "seminal weakness". A variety of drugs and other treatments, including circumcision and castration, were advised as treatment.[4][5][6] Some alternative practitioners, especially herb healers, continue to diagnose and advise treatments for cases of spermatorrhea.[citation needed]

In Western medicine during the nineteenth century, spermatorrhea was regarded as a medical disorder with corrupting and devastating effects on the mind and body.[7] The cure for spermatorrhea was regarded as enforced chastity and avoidance of masturbation, with circumcision sometimes being used as a treatment.[8][9][10]

Ejaculation is currently believed in Western medicine to be self-limiting, and incapable of causing ill effects, other than temporary tiredness and reduction of sexual desire in the individual concerned. In contrast, Traditional Chinese Medicine counts the production of semen as one of the biggest strains on jing (kidney essence).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2][dead link]
  3. ^ [3]
  4. ^ Moscucci, Ornella (1996). "Male masturbation and the offending prepuce". In Miller, Andrew H. Sexualities in Victorian Britain. James Eli Adams. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. pp. 63–64. ISBN 0-253-33066-1. Retrieved April 7, 2011. 
  5. ^ William Acton. "Victorian London – Disease – Spermatorrhoea." From Prostitution, considered in its Moral, Social, and Sanitary Aspects. 2nd edition, 1870. Compiled in Lee Jackson's The Victorian Dictionary.
  6. ^ Darby, Robert J. L. (2005). A Surgical Temptation: The Demonization Of The Foreskin And The Rise Of Circumcision In Britain. Chicago: University of Chicago press. p. 198. ISBN 0-226-13645-0. Retrieved 29 July 2012. 
  7. ^ Darby R (July 2005). "Pathologizing male sexuality: Lallemand, spermatorrhea, and the rise of circumcision". J Hist Med Allied Sci 60 (3): 283–319. doi:10.1093/jhmas/jri042. PMID 15917258. 
  8. ^ Keane JR (June 1994). "The neurological complications of spermatorrhoea". Arch. Neurol. 51 (6): 600–3. doi:10.1001/archneur.1994.00540180078017. PMID 8198472. 
  9. ^ Moscucci, Ornella (1996). "Male masturbation and the offending prepuce". In Miller, Andrew H. Sexualities in Victorian Britain. James Eli Adams. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. pp. 63–64. ISBN 0-253-33066-1. Retrieved April 7, 2011. 
  10. ^ William Acton. "Victorian London - Disease - Spermatorrhoea." From Prostitution, considered in its Moral, Social, and Sanitary Aspects. 2nd edition, 1870. Compiled in Lee Jackson's The Victorian Dictionary.