Sua sponte

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In law, sua sponte (Latin: "of his, her, its or their own accord") or suo motu describes an act of authority taken without formal prompting from another party. The term is usually applied to actions by a judge taken without a prior motion or request from the parties. The form nostra sponte ("of our own accord") is sometimes used by the court itself, when the action is taken by a multi-member court, such as an appellate court, rather than by a single judge (third parties describing such actions would still refer to them as 'sua sponte'). While usually applied to actions of a court, the term may reasonably be applied to actions by government agencies and individuals acting in official capacity.

One situation in which a party might encourage a judge to move sua sponte occurs when that party is preserving a special appearance (usually to challenge jurisdiction), and therefore cannot make motions on its own behalf without making a general appearance. Common reasons for an action taken sua sponte are when the judge determines that the court does not have subject-matter jurisdiction or that the case should be moved to another judge because of a conflict of interest, even if all parties disagree.

Notable cases[edit]

Other uses[edit]

  • The 75th Ranger Regiment (United States Army Rangers) uses Sua Sponte as their regimental motto, referring to the Rangers' ability to accomplish tasks with little to no prompting and to recognize that a Ranger volunteers three times: for the Army, for Airborne School, and for the Ranger Regiment.
  • The Fenn School in Concord, Massachusetts, uses Sua Sponte as its school motto, usually seen written in a furled banner beneath an engraving of the Daniel Chester French The Concord Minute Man of 1775 statue.
  • Since 2009, the Supreme Court of Pakistan has frequently taken up suo motu cases against government authorities there. This includes cases involving violence in the country, government corruption, imposing price ceilings on various commodities, and many other cases.[3][4][5][6][7] The extent to which the court should exercise this authority is a matter of political debate.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Carlisle v. United States, 517 U.S. 416 (Supreme Court of the United States 1996).
  2. ^ Trest v. Cain, 522 U.S. 87 (Supreme Court of the United States 1997).
  3. ^ Karachi violence suo motu: Supreme Court to resume proceedings from today – The Express Tribune
  4. ^ SC reserves verdict in POL GST suo motu case | Pakistan Today | Latest news | Breaking news | Pakistan News | World news | Business | Sport and Multimedia
  5. ^ Pakistan court takes suo motu notice of Hazara killings - The Hindu
  6. ^ Daily Times - Leading News Resource of Pakistan
  7. ^ Pak`s CJ takes suo motu notice of illegal CNG licences
  8. ^ The power of suo motu – The Express Tribune