Superior ramus of the ischium

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Superior ramus of the ischium
Gray235.png
Right hip bone. External surface.
Latin ramus superior ossis ischii
Gray's p.235
Anatomical terms of bone

The superior ramus of the ischium (descending ramus) projects downward and backward from the body and presents for examination three surfaces: external, internal, and posterior.

The external surface is quadrilateral in shape. It is bounded above by a groove which lodges the tendon of the Obturator externus; below, it is continuous with the inferior ramus; in front it is limited by the posterior margin of the obturator foramen; behind, a prominent margin separates it from the posterior surface. In front of this margin the surface gives origin to the Quadratus femoris, and anterior to this to some of the fibers of origin of the Obturator externus; the lower part of the surface gives origin to part of the Adductor magnus.

The internal surface forms part of the bony wall of the lesser pelvis. In front it is limited by the posterior margin of the obturator foramen. Below, it is bounded by a sharp ridge which gives attachment to a falciform prolongation of the sacrotuberous ligament, and, more anteriorly, gives origin to the Transversus perinæi and Ischiocavernosus.

Posteriorly the ramus forms a large swelling, the tuberosity of the ischium

References[edit]

This article incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy.

External links[edit]