Talk:Acne vulgaris

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WikiProject Medicine / Dermatology  (Rated B-class, High-importance)
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Backne[edit]

I was suprised to see that this common portmanteau for acne occuring on ones back was left out of a discussion about acne. I thought it would have its own article.

#13[edit]

what the #13 has to do with benzoyl peroxide? the whole text just talk about it and then slap Isotretinoin references(and bad ones) out of nonwhere

Regarding the section titled "Procedures":[edit]

"As of 2012, evidence for light therapy and lasers is insufficient to recommend them for routine use.[41]"


"Light therapy is an expensive treatment modality[2] and while it appears to provide short term benefit, there is a lack of long term outcome data or data in those with severe acne.[42]"

  • Compare this to the clearly positive description of another personal care practice in the Wikipedia article titled "Tooth brushing." Light therapy is like brushing your teeth. It provides a short term benefit, but must be repeated daily or even more frequently to keep up with the growth of new bacteria. When light therapy is viewed as a form of hygiene, it can be characterized as an important part of skin care for people who are prone to acne breakouts. Inexpensive LED composite bulbs are now available which are intended to be used for this purpose, and do what they are claimed to do. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.173.115.228 (talk) 16:51, 21 December 2013 (UTC)
Re. light therapy sources, all those 4 studies are primary sources. Medical content on Wikipedia needs to be sourced to reliable secondary and tertiary sources (see: WP:MEDRS).
The evidence for toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste twice daily is solid and accepted as the mainstream view, but we should not use arguments based on observations of other articles to justify changes here.
If you have a WP:MEDRS source to support your claim "Inexpensive LED composite bulbs are now available which are intended to be used for this purpose, and do what they are claimed to do." please provide it. Thank you, Lesion (talk) 17:07, 21 December 2013 (UTC)

So... the Titus and Hodge quote stays because they are secondary and four independent studies which corroborate each other must be disregarded because they are primary? What is wrong with this picture? Useful life-changing information is being suppressed. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.173.115.228 (talk) 18:27, 24 December 2013 (UTC)

WP:MEDRS is in place in an attempt to make sure medical content on Wikipedia reflects mainstream medical opinion. You can imagine what things would be like if primary studies were allowed... it would be a free-for-all and any page could be manipulated to reflect fringe theories. Ofc, this is what things are like to an extent, but it would even more so were it not for this guideline. Just need to find a secondary or tertiary source, ideally a systematic review or meta analysis, which supports these treatments. Lesion (talk) 19:58, 24 December 2013 (UTC)

Epidemiology[edit]

We have a good secondary source here [1] Will look at the question of different rates in different regions further tonight. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) (if I write on your page reply on mine) 15:08, 18 January 2014 (UTC)

Yes appear to occur less often in rural / non Westernized populations. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) (if I write on your page reply on mine) 00:14, 22 January 2014 (UTC)
This ref say no global variance [2] Doc James (talk · contribs · email) (if I write on your page reply on mine) 00:18, 22 January 2014 (UTC)
Found a good textbook. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) (if I write on your page reply on mine) 00:37, 22 January 2014 (UTC)

Orange skin[edit]

Acne might cause small maccules of hyperpigmentation if there is scarring (which image does show) ... not sure this is described as orange skin...looks like the orange color might be an artifact of the lighting and color settings of the camera that took the pic. Lesion (talk) 17:14, 31 January 2014 (UTC)

Agree acne does not cause jaundice. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) (if I write on your page reply on mine) 17:18, 31 January 2014 (UTC)

[new paper] Diet and Acne Update: Carbohydrates Emerge as the Main Culprit[edit]

Fulltext available here: http://jddonline.com/articles/dermatology/S1545961614P0428X --Siddhant (talk) 19:48, 13 April 2014 (UTC)

Thanks. We more or less state this already. Will incorporate soon. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) (if I write on your page reply on mine) 04:39, 16 April 2014 (UTC)

. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Drole007 (talkcontribs) 10:44, 20 April 2014 (UTC)