Talk:Ethylene-vinyl acetate

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Foam rubber[edit]

Why does Foam Rubber redirect here? The article says nothing about it. --Mdwyer 17:26, 8 April 2006 (UTC)

i have the impression that 'foam rubber' is a popular expresion, that describes eva, and many other materials. Maybe foam rubber should be an seperate article indeed Rotor DB 17:51, 21 January 2007 (UTC)

deleting "sometimes known as Acetate"[edit]

The article states that EVA is also known as ...sometimes simply as "acetate". Anybody mind if I delete this? Acetate is not the same as EVA, and this statement is more likely to confuse people than to unconfuse them. (If somebody puts the sentence back in, could you at least add "inaccurately" in there?) Geoffrey.landis (talk) 20:15, 28 August 2008 (UTC)

Definately do delete this (although I think you already have!) Not the same thing at all, and in my experience, not known as "Acetate" either! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.128.41.104 (talk) 10:04, 13 August 2009 (UTC)

Removing the line was an excellent idea...Pdcook (talk) 17:03, 21 October 2009 (UTC)

Could the locations of sources of this, where it is supplied, possibly be included? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.182.236.131 (talk) 16:40, 18 May 2010 (UTC)

Hi Just wondering what the difference between ethylene vinyl acetate and vinyl acetate ethylene is half way through bit confusing. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Biofuelsimon (talkcontribs) 10:36, 24 August 2010 (UTC)

Removed from article[edit]

I have removed the following text from the section titled "Health Risks {of EVA combustion by-products, not EVA copolymer itself}". It is simply too confused to be useful. If someone can make sense of it and rewrite it coherently, maybe it can then be added back to the article. -- Ed (Edgar181) 13:10, 8 April 2011 (UTC)

Vinyl acetate ethylene can release irritating and/or toxic fumes and vapors if involved in a fire. Vinyl acetate is listed in the [[MSDS]] <ref>[http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9927644 MSDS Vinyl Acetate]</ref> for producing acute effects such as skin irritation, eye irritation, and lung irritation and has been proven by the [[Occupational Safety and Health Administration]] to cause carcinogenic effects (Specifics not listed) <ref>[http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9927644 Vinyl Acetate Material safety data sheet Sections 2&3]</ref>. :{Note this former statement [2] should not confuse EVA copolymer or a component of EVA copolymer with vinyl acetate monomer, i.e. unpolymerized H2C=CH-OOCCH3 monomers, the latter are carcinogenic due to reactivity of the constituent ethylene group H2C=CH-, in this small organic compound; but large EVA macromolecules are extremely unlikely to be carcinogenic because incorporation of vinyl acetate monomers into main ethylene chain eliminates this fairly reactive ethylene group, so unless EVA were contaminated with vinyl acetate monomers (where the issue becomes the vinyl acetate contamination, not the EVA per se) then the ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer itself would not be expected to be a carcinogen. Of course combustion of EVA could release by-products of vinyl acetate monomer in the smoke and these may prove carcinogenic if inhaled, but then exposure to many other by-products could also be responsible (a very good reason not to smoke anything period) so it would be extremely difficult to conclude only vinyl acetate monomers were responsible. Likewise if large quantities of smoke, by-products of combustion, and carbon monoxide were inhaled one might die from smoke inhalation long before cancer could potentially develop. But to continue with the present health agenda being promulgated here . . . } :However in conjunction with the presence of the copolymer ethylene vinyl acetate used in cigarettes, as a result of the passing of the [[fire safe cigarette]] law in many US states, some citizens are worried about and question the possible health risks associated with internal ingestion of EVA when used as a fire retardant due to its ability to extinguish a lit cigarette if it does not receive constant inhalation. This could potentially impose another slight health risk caused by cigarettes because of the fact that it forces people to smoke cigarettes faster in order for to stay lit, which could induce [[chain smoking]]. This was another issue brought up by many tobacco users during the passage of legislation which forced the usage of EVA in factory made cigarettes. :At the moment, no major studies have been conducted researching any long term risks caused by EVA {combustion by-products}.