Talk:Gujarati alphabet

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Be careful in the romanized notation[edit]

This message is for the person who wrote the article. There is no long vowel <ā> in Gujəratī. So better is to find something else because it is misleading specially for those who are working as linguists. They could interpret it as a long vowel while there is not. And if there is no solution you can add a side note.

Thank You — Preceding unsigned comment added by 88.175.163.212 (talk) 22:33, 6 March 2013 (UTC)


Picture[edit]

Can anyone upload a picture for this script? I can't find /any/ free Gujarati Unicode font. Anárion 14:34, 22 Dec 2004 (UTC)

Please see http://www.alanwood.net/unicode/fonts_windows.html#gujarati - I'm useing the Sarasvati font from Apple for Gujarati, it is free but the download is rather complicated (you have to register, then buy the one for $0 in the shop).
Adding a picture is neverrtheless a good idea.
Pjacobi 14:55, 2004 Dec 22 (UTC)


How to use on the web[edit]

I was hoping to find some information here, or in a linked page, on the use of Gujerati script on the web. Andy Mabbett 30 June 2005 15:26 (UTC)

I don't know of any Gujarati specific problems on the WWW. Why should there be any? Are you looking for Unicode and HTML? Also the following page has some general advice: Project:Setting_up_your_browser_for_Indic_scripts. --Pjacobi June 30, 2005 16:27 (UTC)
Very helpful, thank you. I'll add the former to the article. I'd also be interested in infomration on the tools people use to author pages in Gujerati and similar scripts. Andy Mabbett 1 July 2005 13:08 (UTC)
Uh, that's an open ended set of questions. To start with, the preferences how to author HTML vary widely, from preferring a straight text editor to authoring systems which completely isolate you from the HTML.
If you know HTML and are just seeking a text editor which doesn't garble up the Gujarati characters, you can try the free Yudit [1] (Windows binary available but will look somewhat alien on a Windows system). It can handle all of Unicode and has a wide variety of builtin keymaps, easily switchable. For Gujarati it has the INSCRIPT keyboard layout and a custom one.
Pjacobi July 2, 2005 20:59 (UTC)
Thank you again. Andy Mabbett 4 July 2005 10:11 (UTC)

Obscure Question[edit]

I'll just put this out there for the heck of it, because I'm dying to know and information on Gujarati is hard enough to come by, let alone Parsi Gujarati! Is it just me, or do their vowels fall in odd places, like to the left of where they would normally be? Khiradtalk 20:24, 27 January 2006 (UTC)

Not sure if I understand your question correctly, but the script "writing" rules of Gujarati script are almost identical with those of Devanagari, and don't think anything falls at an odd place, let alone vowels... --ΜιĿːtalk 10:48, 30 January 2006 (UTC)
What Khirad probably means is that the short "i" is written *before* the consonant, but pronounced after it. This is quite illogical and counter-intuitive, but it has historical reasons. Many Brahmi-derived writing systems have such things, including Thai and Khmer. — N-true 21:40, 10 March 2007 (UTC)