Talk:Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton

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Paintings[edit]

Has never anyone doubted whether the portrait of the fair haired young man is really Henry Wriothesley, the 3rd Earl? In the portrait of his youth, and as a grown man, he has brown eyes. In the portrait of him being 21, his eyes are blue. How is that possible, if it is supposed to be the same man. I know that paintings from back then differ a lot, but the eye colour? Gabriele Breder (talk) 20:19, 1 December 2013 (UTC)

Untitled[edit]

What does it mean to "cole and hug?" It's marked off with quotation marks, but there is no citation to be found. Can anyone help clarify this? The reference is under the heading on the association between Wriothesley and the Earl of Essex.

New Earl of Oxford Paternity Theory[edit]

This section violates wikipedia guidelines on several counts, starting with its reliance on self-published material by an author with no standing in the fields of Shakespearean studies or early modern English history. Whittemore's unproven theories are presented without qualification as facts. The book is hyped as "setting forth a consistent and coherent explanation of the sequence of the sonnets as they follow events from Henry Wriothesley’s life," a description that will amaze the vast majority of readers as an overstatement entirely contrary to the principles of careful elucidation of controversial claims on which Wikipedia has built its reputation. It would be appropriate to eliminate the entire section and replace it with a more detailed but balanced account of the history of Southampton's possible involvement as fair youth of the Shakespearean sonnets as propounded by various scholars. --Twinkletoes2u 15:03, 1 April 2007 (UTC)

Agreed. I have tagged it. If there's a more appropriate tag, please update. - PKM 17:15, 1 April 2007 (UTC)

Pronunciation of Name[edit]

Concerning the pronunciation of Wriothesley's name, is it 'Rye-slee' or 'Rizz-lee'. This could be clearer. --Grantsky (talk) 14:09, 21 March 2008 (UTC)

According to Jonathan Bate's book "The Genius of Shakespeare", those who knew Wriothesley said it was pronounced "Rosely". This makes a lot of sense, since it makes a lot of rose-puns possible, and can explain why the word "Rose" is italicized in sonnet 1. 82.143.208.73 (talk) 21:50, 5 March 2010 (UTC)

jonathan bate is quite possibly wrong. the pronunciation of Wriothesley is a matter of serious debate that might never be settled. the wikipage should reflect that. 173.246.203.158 (talk) 04:04, 29 December 2011 (UTC)

Onlie Begetter[edit]

In the passage about Thorpe's dedication of the sonnets to the "onlie begetter", down a couple of lines there is the word "better". Is this a misspelling of "begetter"? Otherwise, the meaning of these sentences is unclear. -- Grantsky (talk) 14:09, 21 March 2008 (UTC)

Life Under King James I (and IV)[edit]

Was it Grey or Wriothesley who was in great trouble in 1621? Which took up the Protestant side in Germany, and proposed action against the Barbary pirates? The passage is ambiguous. If it is Wriothesley we're talking about, the sentence about Grey should be in parentheses. -- Grantsky (talk) 14:22, 21 March 2008 (UTC)

"one of William Shakespeare's patrons"[edit]

I've just been reading a couple of news articles about Wriothesley (here and here), and both describe him as Shakespeare's "only known patron". This clashes with the opening statement here which says he was "one of Shakespeares patrons". Is there a basis for the "one of" claim? If not perhaps the phrasing should be "a patron of Shakespeare" (which covers both cases) if there is some contention over this fact. -- BigBadaboom0 (talk) 02:33, 10 March 2009 (UTC)

Since Shakespeare was in a theatre troupe sanctioned by the throne, I think it is reasonable to see Queen Elizabeth and King James as his patrons, too. Hence, there was more than one. 82.143.208.73 (talk) 21:53, 5 March 2010 (UTC)

Could it have been possible that Henry Wriothesley was in fact biological father of Henry de Vere, 18th Earl of Oxford, and thus interested in the person of Will Shakspere of Stratford? --Zbrnajsem (talk) 17:06, 20 June 2011 (UTC)

1911 Classic Encyclopedia[edit]

Much of this article reproduces word for word the entry in the 1911 Classic Encyclopedia [1], now in the public domain. It should be possible to incorporate other reliable sources, and revise the wording so that it's not directly copied from that single source. NinaGreen (talk) 19:18, 2 December 2012 (UTC)