Talk:Kelvin wave

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The other Kelvin waves[edit]

Hallo,

There are actually two phenomenae called "Kelvin waves" - the others are the shear waves found in the shearing-sheet approximation made popular (in astrophysics, at least) by Goldreich and Lynden-Bell in 1965. These waves have a time dependent wavenumber k_x = q \Omega k_y t. I'd add this to the article but I actually came here seeking the original reference, so maybe once I've found that... 7daysahead (talk) 13:54, 17 January 2012 (UTC)

Credit where credit is due[edit]

I was amazed to find no ref to Kelvin. Here, or on his page.

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract;jsessionid=DE35745A200A3AC1D8D4BAD3A899BB0A.journals?fromPage=online&aid=413288

needs proper formatting. FX (talk) 16:37, 7 March 2012 (UTC)