Talk:Principality of Bulgaria

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Former countries (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Former countries, a collaborative effort to improve Wikipedia's coverage of defunct states and territories (and their subdivisions). If you would like to participate, please join the project.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 
WikiProject Bulgaria (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Bulgaria, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Bulgaria on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Why was the pretence of Ottoman suzerainty kept up and why was it so common?[edit]

Whilst I recognise, of course, that the Principality of Bulgaria was to all intents and purposes independent, nonetheless it still recognised Ottoman suzerainy and paid tribute. I've noticed his was quite a widespread phenomenom with the territories agitating for freedom from Ottoman Domination: with Serbia and Romania having tributary status until 1878, Bulgaria until 1908, and Egypt and Sudan were technically parts of the Ottoman Empire until 1914, and Cyprus and Bosnia were de jure Ottoman Provinces until 1914 and 1908 respectively, despite their de facto control by Britain and Austria, respectively, not to mention places like the Cretan State and the Principality of Samos.

What I'm wondering is, why was this done, and why was it so widespread? Why was de facto control of these places preferred to de jure annexation, which would have happened in most other situations. Why was there so much trouble taken to not only accomodate the Ottoman Sultan, but to seemingly not offend him?JWULTRABLIZZARD (talk) 20:54, 23 April 2013 (UTC)

Client State of Russia???[edit]

I understand that there were times when the Russian Empire had tremendous influence in the principality (like in the first five years or so). But once Ferdinand came to power relations between Bulgaria and Russia turned sour and Ferdinand brought Bulgaria closer to Austria. Towards the end he was playing see-saw between the two powers (source: Foxy Ferdinand, 1861-1948, Tsar of Bulgaria; By Stephen Constant (Published in 1979). That all being said, I don't think we should refer to the Principality of Bulgaria as a client state of Russia. Kndimov (talk) 23:29, 16 January 2014 (UTC)