Tap (film)

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Tap
Gregoryhinestap.jpg
DVD cover
Directed by Nick Castle
Produced by Gary Adelson
Fran Saperstein
Richard Vane
Written by Nick Castle
Starring Gregory Hines
Music by James Newton Howard
Cinematography David Gribble
Edited by Patrick Kennedy
Distributed by Tri-Star Pictures
Release date(s) February 10, 1989
Running time 106 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Box office $9,114,702

Tap is a 1989 drama film written and directed by Nick Castle. It stars Gregory Hines and Sammy Davis, Jr.

Plot[edit]

Max Washington (Gregory Hines), just released from prison after serving time for burglary, is a talented tap dancer. His late father owned a dance studio that is now run by Little Mo (Sammy Davis, Jr.), whose daughter Amy Simms (Suzzanne Douglas) gives lessons to children. Back on the streets, Max isn't interested in dancing again but he is interested in seeing Amy, his former girlfriend. A local gangster, Nicky, doesn't care for Max personally but does try to recruit him to take part in a robbery. Amy has a job as dancer in an upcoming Broadway show and tells its choreographer about Max, hoping to land him a role in the chorus. Max is reluctant to agree to it, then incensed when he is humiliated during the auditions. Max must decide whether to swallow his pride and dance the way the man wants, or give up his art once and for all and return to a life of crime.

Production[edit]

This was the final film appearance of Sammy Davis, Jr. The cast also included Suzzanne Douglas, Savion Glover, Joe Morton, and Terrence E. McNally. The original score was composed by James Newton Howard and the dance routines performed in Washington's old hangout, a club patronized by "hoofers", were choreographed by Henry LeTang. Also included are cameos, particularly during a challenge sequence, by veteran dancers Arthur Duncan, Bunny Briggs, Howard Sims, Steve Condos, Harold Nicholas, and Jimmy Slyde.

Cast[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]