Thank offering

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The thank offering (Hebrew: תֹּודָה, pronounced Todah) or sacrifice of thanksgiving (Hebrew zevakh hatodah זֶבַח הַתֹּודָה ) was an optional offering under the Law of Moses.[1] This is also termed the "thanksgiving offering."[2]

If he offer it for a thanksgiving, then he shall offer with the sacrifice of thanksgiving unleavened cakes mingled with oil, and unleavened wafers anointed with oil, and cakes mingled with oil, of fine flour, fried.

— Lev 7:12 KJV

The Hebrew noun todah "thanksgiving" is derived from the Hiphil of the verb yadah (יָדָה) "to praise." In Psalm 107:22 and elsewhere no physical offering, only praise, is implied.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The international standard Bible encyclopedia - Page 268 Geoffrey W. Bromiley 1995 "The thank offering (zebah hattodd) called for a cereal offering to accompany the animal sacrifice. Its purpose was to render an expression of thanks for deliverance or blessings granted. No previous promise or vow was involved"
  2. ^ The Jewish Study Bible: Featuring The Jewish Publication Society Adele Berlin, Marc Zvi Brettler, Michael Fishbane - 2003 "17 applies to the thanksgiving offering as well but would take place on the second day"
  3. ^ "Psalm 107:22". Bible Hub. Retrieved 24 January 2014. 

External links[edit]