That's What

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That's What
Studio album by Leo Kottke
Released 1990
Recorded Mike Jones Film Corp., Minneapolis, MN
Genre Folk, jazz
Length 37:34
Label Private Music (2068-2-P)
Producer Willard Oliver, Leo Kottke
Leo Kottke chronology
My Father's Face
(1989)
That's What
(1990)
Great Big Boy
(1991)

That's What is one of the more idiosyncratic releases by solo steel-string guitar artist Leo Kottke. It is distinctive in its jazzy nature and "talking" songs ("Buzzby" and "Husbandry"). It reached #24 on Billboard's Top New Age Albums charts, Kottke's highest charting position on Billboard.

The song "Little Snoozer" is played on a Charvel demo model of a Danelectro 6-string bass guitar tuned one octave lower than a standard 6-string guitar.

Kottke has re-recorded at least two more versions of "Jesus Maria".

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars [1]

The Allmusic of the album stated "Leo Kottke has always been a highly idiosyncratic guitar player whose music is infused with his wry sense of humor. That's What is no exception, with Kottke's guitar work drawing from jazzy, blues and folk sources... Tying it all together is Kottke's fine guitar playing, as nimble and as quirky as ever."[1]

Track listing[edit]

All songs by Leo Kottke except as noted.

  1. "Little Snoozer" – 3:53
  2. "Buzzby" – 3:57
  3. "What the Arm Said" – 2:54
  4. "Creature Feature" – 4:14
  5. "Oddball" – 2:51
  6. "Czech Bounce" – 3:38
  7. "Mid-Air" (Willard O. Peterson) – 3:23
  8. "The Great One" – 3:22
  9. "Husbandry" – 4:52
  10. "Jesus Maria" (Carla Bley) – 4:30

Personnel[edit]

  • Leo Kottke - guitar
  • Billy Peterson - string bass, 5-string electric bass, drums, piano, synth, Farfisa Professional
  • Bruce Paulson - tenor & bass trombones
  • Gordy Knudtson - percussion

Production notes[edit]

  • Produced by Willard Oliver & Leo Kottke
  • Engineered by Paul Martinson
  • Assistant engineers: Scott Bartel & Sam Hudson
  • Mastered by Doug Sax
  • Arrangements by Willard Oliver except guitar on "Jesus Maria" arranged by Tim Sparks

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Regards from Chuck Pink > Review". Allmusic. Retrieved June 28, 2011. 

External links[edit]