Third-party billing

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Third-party billing is a form of billing where an intermediary handles the invoicing and payment between a purchaser and a vendor.

Telecommunications[edit]

In telecommunications, it can refer to an operator-assisted telephone call, usually in conjunction with the assistance of a live or automated telephone operator.

It can also refer to a service that allows consumers to make purchases through authorized merchants, service providers and telecommunications companies, and have charges placed directly on their local phone bill, as an alternate payment option.[1]

Third party billing serves nearly 12 million households in the United States, and handles hundreds of millions of authorized transactions for consumers and businesses each year.[2] Several businesses, including Fortune 500 companies, choose to have their services included on their phone bills to reduce administrative needs and costs.

Transportation[edit]

In transportation, third party billing is the transference of transportation charges to a party other than the shipper or consignee.

Cramming[edit]

Cramming happens when third party billing occurs on phones without consent of the person being billed.

References[edit]