Timothy A Stewart

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Timothy A Stewart (born 30 September 1952) is a molecular biologist. He graduated from the University of Otago (BScHons, PhD.)

Stewart was born in Christchurch, New Zealand. He was a pioneer in the technique of transferring recombinant genes to mice (transgenic mice) and in 1988 he and Philip Leder were granted a patent on a genetically engineered mammal. This "oncomouse" patent was the first to be issued covering a higher life form.[1]

From 1984 to 2003 Stewart was a scientist at Genentech where he developed the concept that the type I interferons might be a significant component in the initiation or progression of type I diabetes.[2]

He has published 61 peer reviewed papers listed in Scopus; the most highly cited has 1013 citations to it,[3] and he has 31 papers with 34 citations or more.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oncomouse
  2. ^ Neutralizing interferon alpha as a therapeutic approach to autoimmune diseases. Stewart TA Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 2003 Apr;14(2):139-54.
  3. ^ "An essential role for interferon γ in resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection" Flynn, J.L., Chan, J., Triebold, K.J., Dalton, D.K., Stewart, T.A., Bloom, B.R Journal of Experimental Medicine Volume 178, Issue 6, 1993, Pages 2249-2254 doi:10.1084/jem.178.6.2249