Tony Byrne (boxer)

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For others named Anthony Byrne or Tony Byrne, see Anthony Byrne (disambiguation).
Tony Byrne (boxer)
Personal information
Born (1930-07-06)6 July 1930
Drogheda, Ireland
Died 27 April 2013(2013-04-27) (aged 82)

Anthony Byrne, more commonly common known as Tony Byrne or Socks Byrne (6 July 1930 – 27 April 2013)[1] was an amateur boxer. Byrne won a bronze medal for Ireland at the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, in the lightweight division.

Early life and career[edit]

Byrne was born in Drogheda, Ireland. Doubt had been cast over whether Byrne would have the funds to travel to Melbourne to participate in the 1956 Olympics. However, a fundraising campaign under the banner of "Send Byrne to Melbourne" was created, and it raised £653 from local businesses in Drogheda to send him on his quest for glory down under.

Melbourne Olympics[edit]

Byrne carried the flag for Ireland at the opening ceremony and was the captain of the Irish boxing team. He beat opponents from Czechoslovakia and United States before losing in the semifinal on a split decision to Harry Kurschat of Germany.[2][3] A few months later, he showed what might have been when he beat the eventual Gold Medallist, Dick McTaggart, in an Ireland-England International at the Royal Albert Hall.

Olympic results[edit]

Life After Boxing[edit]

In 1962, Byrne, and his wife Honor, emigrated to Canada. The Byrne's settled in Canada and have a family of two girls and a set of twin boys. In 2006 a statue of Byrne was unveiled in his hometown.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Melbourne Olympics bronze medallist Tony 'Socks' Byrne dies aged 82". rte.ie/news. 27 April 2013. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  2. ^ Liam Reilly. ""1956 - A year to remember for Drogheda"". IrishBoxing.com. Retrieved 27 May 2006. 
  3. ^ CATHOLINE BUTLER. ""Drogheda Prepares to Unveil a Statue of Its Favourite Son"". Celtic Connection On-line. Archived from the original on 30 October 2006. Retrieved 27 May 2006. 
  4. ^ Kavanagh, Caroline (6 December 2006). "Tony gives it socks as statue unveiled". drogheda-independent.ie. Retrieved 27 April 2013.