Toronto municipal election, 1985

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The 1985 Toronto municipal election was held to elect members of municipal councils, school boards, and hydro commissions in the six municipalities that made up Metropolitan Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The election was held on November 12, 1985.

Toronto[edit]

Mayor[edit]

The mayoral election saw progressive North Toronto councillor Anne Johnston challenge incumbent Art Eggleton. Eggleton won reelection by a significant margin, with Johnston not even winning her former ward.

Results
Art Eggleton - 92,994
Anne Johnston - 59,817
Ann Ladas - 1,473
Gaston Schwab - 1,228
Aaron Abraham - 1,077
John J. Benz - 583
Skip Evans - 557
Fred Dunn - 513
Gary Watson - 433
Ben Kerr - 422
Ronald Rodgers - 341
Andrejs Murnieks - 266
Warren J. Van Evera - 223
Gary Weagle - 202

City and Metro council[edit]

Ward boundaries used in the 1985 election

The election system was changed in Toronto for the 1985 election. Previously two councillors had been elected from each ward, with the one who received the most votes also getting a spot on Metro Toronto council in addition to their city council seat. For the 1985 the two positions were split, and voters now cast a separate vote for city council and for metro council. Most pairs of incumbent councillors reached tacit agreements with one running for city council and the other for metro. The one battle between two incumbents was in Ward 5 where in a surprise upset junior councillor Ron Kanter defeated the long serving Ying Hope. Two other long serving councillors were defeated. Joe Piccininni who had represent the Corso d'Italia for 25 years lost to 28 year old Betty Disero. In the east end NDPers Dorothy Thomas lost in a surprise upset to conservative Paul Christie.

Ward 1 (Swansea and Bloor West Village)
Metro
Derwyn Shea (incumbent) - 10,429
Diana Fancher - 2,675
Robert Szajkowski - 1,270
City
William Boytchuk (incumbent) - 8,491
David White - 6,049
Len Bugeja - 1,030
Ward 2 (Parkdale and Brockton)
Metro
Ben Grys (incumbent) - 7,189
Susan Shaw - 4,223
City
Chris Korwin-Kuczynski (incumbent) - 8,617
Owen Leach - 1,638
Hubert P. Antoic - 777
Jimmy Talpa - 353
Ward 3 (Davenport and Corso Italia)
Metro
Richard Gilbert (incumbent) - 6,745
John Martin - 2,722
City
Betty Disero - 5,096
Joseph Piccininni (incumbent) - 3,835
Judy De Sousa - 1,871
Nick Attarano - 282
Ward 4 (Trinity-Bellwoods and Little Italy)
Metro
Joe Pantalone (incumbent) - 6,519
Joe Pimentel - 2,429
Antonio Nunziata - 666
Hiwon Pak - 336
City
Tony O'Donohue (incumbent) - 5,617
David English - 2,755
Vince Nigro - 2,637
Ward 5 (The Annex and Yorkville)
Metro
Ron Kanter (incumbent) - 9,788
Ying Hope (incumbent) - 5,849
City
Nadine Nowlan - 7,018
David Scott - 4,387
Lawson Oates - 2,509
Ward 6 (Financial District, Toronto - University of Toronto)
Metro
Jack Layton (incumbent) - 9,037
Pearl Loo - 1,972
Edward Jackson - 1,824
Lex Dunkelman - 1,183
Citizen Amber - 414
City
Dale Martin (incumbent) - 6,791
Peter Maloney - 4,923
Jerry Borins - 1,902
Steve BFG Johnson - 1,059
Ward 7 (Regent Park and Riverdale)
Metro
Joanne Campbell (incumbent) - 9,293
James P. Atkins - 1,490
Jack McLeavey - 775
City
Barbara Hall - 6,379
Bill Mole - 2,807
Mike Armstrong - 2,232
Christopher Goulios - 613
Ward 8 (Riverdale)
Metro
Fred Beavis (incumbent) - 7,637
Richard Tyssen - 3,604
Sam Baichoo - 494
City
Thomas Clifford (incumbent) - 7,068
Sheila Cram - 4,035
Michael Tegtmeyer - 339
Ward 9 (The Beaches)
Metro
Tom Jakobek (incumbent) - 12,827
Patterson Higgins - 2,775
Jeremy Agar - 747
City
Paul Christie - 8,985
Dorothy Thomas (incumbent) - 7,042
Ward 10 (Rosedale and North Toronto)
Metro
June Rowlands (incumbent) - acclaimed
City
Michael Walker - acclaimed
Ward 11 (Forest Hill and North Toronto)
Metro
Kay Gardner - 8,369
Belinda Morin - 7,905
March Tigh - 2,614
City
Michael Gee (incumbent) - 15,345
Christopher Nelson - 2,810

Results taken form the November 13, 1985 Toronto Star and might not exactly match final tallies.

East York[edit]

Mayor (East York) - David Johnson

Etobicoke[edit]

Board of Control[edit]

Candidate Votes
Dick O'Brien (incumbent) 34,248
Lois Griffin 33,175
Leonard Braithwaite (incumbent) 33,085
Morley Kells 29,817
Chris Stockwell (incumbent) 29,629
Doug Holyday 28,982
James Shawera 5,473
Total 6,982

North York[edit]

Mel Lastman is re-elected mayor of the City and serves until 1997. Maria Augimeri elected to Ward 5, Peter Li Preti elected to Ward 3 and Mario Gentile re-elected as Ward 2 councillor. Esther Shiner is re-elected to Board of Control, but dies in office in 1987. Norm Gardner loses his seat on the Board of Control.


1985 Toronto municipal election, North York Board of Control (four members elected)edit
Candidate Total votes  % of total votes
(x)Esther Shiner 67,345 19.47
(x)Robert Yuill 53,709 15.53
Norman Gardner 51,137 14.78
Howard Moscoe 42,303 12.23
Mike Foster 35,838 10.36
Frank Esposito 21,365 6.18
Bruce Davidson 18,926 5.47
Sonnee Cohen 12,822 3.71
Bernadette Michael 12,764 3.69
Angelo Natale 12,416 3.59
Cora Urbel 7,791 2.25
Arthur Zins 4,961 1.43
Ayube Ally 4,571 1.32
Total valid votes 345,948 100.00
  • Cora Urbel (born Cora Kevany) was a well-known community activist in North York, serving as leader of the North York Concerned Citizens Committee in 1984. She called for an investigation into the approval of the city's Rampart Development Project, and criticized road reforms that she believed would cause increased traffic in residential areas.[1] She was endorsed by John Sewell in 1985 as one of North York's most prominent reformers, and was expected to be a strong candidate.[2] Her poor showing was a surprise to most observers. Urbel served as president of the Don Mills Residents' Association after the election, and promoted "open space" community development.[3] She campaigned for North York City Council's tenth ward in 1988, and lost to Don Yuill in a fairly close contest. She was fifty-nine years old during this campaign, and strongly opposed the extension of Leslie St. past Eglinton Avenue and the decision to widen Don Mills Rd. and Victoria Park Ave.[4] Urbel supported a series of austerity measures in the early 1990s. She called for education spending cuts in 1991, and spoke against a proposed 1% Metro Toronto tax hike in 1994.[5] She died on March 28, 1999. A road in Toronto was named after her the following year.[6]
  • Arthur Zins was a self-employed businessman and former public utility administrator, who argued that North York needed his public administration skills.[7] He campaigned for a position on the North York Hydro Board in 1980, and finished last in a field of nineteen candidates.
  • Ayube Ally owned a manufacturing plant, and recommended improved facilities for senior citizens.[8]
  • Ward 8 Bev Salmon
  • Ward 10 Marie Labatte
  • Ward 12 Barry Burton

School Board Trustees[edit]

  • Ward 8 Gerri Gershon
  • Ward 10 Rene Gordon
  • Ward 12 Kenneth Crowley

Scarborough[edit]

Mayor[edit]

Board of Control[edit]

Public Utilities[edit]

  • Cavanagh ; 45,921
  • Beatty ; 33,268
  • Stewart ; 27,686
  • Speares ; 10,960
  • Nurse ; 9,445
  • Alix ; 6,827

City Councillors[edit]

Ward 1 -

  • Barron ; 3,100
  • Dan Danielson ; NDP ; 1,985
  • White ; 1,761

Ward 2 -

  • Gerry Altobello ; 2,304
  • Boyle ; 1,662
  • McKenzie ; 1,375
  • Judd ; 574
  • Morton ; 476

Ward 3 -

  • Wardrope ; 3,034
  • Robertson ; 2,256
  • McDermott ; 776
  • Catre ; 769
  • Zaidi ; 635

Ward 4 -

  • Christensen ; 4,195
  • Ligold ; 2,362

Ward 5

Ward 6

  • Cruickshank ; acclamation

Ward 7

Ward 8

  • Eidt ; 4,804
  • Murray ; 1,912
  • Chadha ; 717

Ward 9

  • Mackie ; 6,134
  • DeSouza ; 2,218

Ward 10

Ward 11

  • Cavalier ; 3,828
  • Anderson ; 1,398

Ward 12 ;

  • Mahood ; 2,232
  • Watson, Ron ; 1,350
  • Pearce ; 1,171
  • Lam, A ; 898
  • Watson, Bob ; 793
  • Manning ; 433

Ward 13

  • Sanders ; 1,858
  • Nutter ; 1,394
  • Kenton ; 773
  • Chana ; 767
  • Chappell ; 462
  • Coyle ; 340

Ward 14

  • Montgomery ; 3,076
  • McLennon ; 621
  • Sharma ; 481
  • Loughlin, B ; 386
  • Russell ; 338
  • Kukade ; 158

York[edit]

In York, Alan Tonks was easily re-elected. Michael Colle who was alderman for ward 2 in the previous term tried unsuccessfully to obtain a seat on the Board of Control. New councillors Tony Mandarano in Ward 2 and Bob McLean in Ward 6 won their races. Bill Saundercook was the only winner to unseat a running incumbent in Ward 8.[9]

Mayor
Alan Tonks
Guy D'Onofrio
Board of Control (2 elected)
Fergy Brown
Philip White
Michael Colle
Ward 1
Bill Nobleman (Acclaimed)
Ward 2
Tony Mandarano
Maria de Pasquale
Ward 3
Tony Rizzo (incumbent) won by 570 votes
Ron Bradd
Ward 4
Nicolo Fortunato (incumbent) won by 220 votes
Patrick Canavan
Ward 5
Chris Tonks (incumbent)
Jim Fera
Ward 6
Bob McLean won by 712 votes
Lindsay Cott
Ward 7
Gary Bloor (incumbent) won by 287 votes
Richard Taverner
Ward 8
Bill Saundercook 2,317
Michael Waclawski (incumbent) 2,082

School Board Trustees[edit]

School Board Ward 1

  • K. Hen (Acclamation)

School Board Ward 2

  • P. Karageorgos

School Board Ward 3

  • R. Russell

School Board Ward 4

  • N D'urzo

School Board Ward 5

  • P Hainer

School Board Ward 6

  • J Gribben

School Board Ward 7

  • S. Mould

School Board Ward 8

  • M McDowell

Metro Toronto Separate School Trustees[edit]

1985 Toronto municipal election, Metro Toronto Separate School Board, Ward Fifteenedit
Candidate Total votes  % of total votes
Anthony Perruzza 1,999 33.80
(x)Tony Nigro 1,940 32.80
Ralph Paonessa 1,130 19.10
A. Renato Lavalle 846 14.30
Total valid votes 5,915 100.00
  • Antonio (Tony) Nigro served on the Metro Toronto Separate School Board from 1974 to 1985. He was himself a teacher with the North York Board of Education.[10] He tried to return to the Toronto Catholic School Board in the 2000 Toronto municipal election, but was unsuccessful.
  • Ralph Paonessa was a first time candidate. He ran for Ward 15 again in 1988, and finished a closer second against Rick Morelli. A 1988 newspaper article indicates that he fifty-two years old, and was co-pastor of St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church. He wanted students to receive "a truly Catholic education".[11] Paonessa is now Friar at Saint Lawrence the Martyr Friary in Scarborough, and is active with the National Congress of Italian Canadians.[12]
  • A. Renato Lavalle was a forty-three-year-old school principal, who sought to maintain the religious orientation of the Catholic school system.[13]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Ross Howard, "Probe North York plans, links, group urges Davis", Globe and Mail, 7 November 1984, M1; "Price tag: $70-million plus", Globe and Mail, 27 February 1985, M4.
  2. ^ John Sewell, "A promise of sparks in North York race", Globe and Mail, 2 October 1985, A15; John Sewell, "Spirit of compromise for Board of Control", Globe and Mail, 8 November 1985, A13.
  3. ^ Lynne Ainsworth, "30-year-old Don Mills to be studied", Toronto Star, 7 October 1986, N11; Janice Turner, "Winds of change in Don Mills", Toronto Star, 11 November 1986, A6; Michael Best, "Angry residents lose bid to block home for seniors", Toronto Star, 13 October 1987, N1; Michael Best, "North York residents turn out to express desire for parkland", Toronto Star, 10 May 1988, N2; Royson James, "Traffic is choking Don Mills roadways, report concludes", Toronto Star, 5 July 1988, A7.
  4. ^ Lynne Ainsworth, "Building urban pressures put ward on the defensive", Toronto Star, 27 October 1988, A7.
  5. ^ "$72 million hacked off board budget", Toronto Star, 28 March 1991, A6; Royson James, "Labor backs, business boos tax hike", Toronto Star, 10 February 1994, A6.
  6. ^ "Cora Urbel: Obituary", Globe and Mail, 31 March 2006; Naming of Private Lane at 111 Barber Greene Road, Toronto City Council, accessed 19 October 2006.
  7. ^ Dyanne Rivers, "Traffic an issue in controllers' race", Globe and Mail, 9 November 1985, A16.
  8. ^ Dyanne Rivers, "Traffic an issue in controllers' race", Globe and Mail, 6 November 1985, A16.
  9. ^ MacLeod, Robert (November 13, 1985). "Tonks wins York in one-man show". The Globe and Mail. p. A21. 
  10. ^ Julia Turner, "Get rid of portables, separate school hopefuls say", Globe and Mail, 6 November 1980, P5.
  11. ^ "The candidates", Toronto Star, 11 November 1988, A14.
  12. ^ Province of the Immaculate Concept: Order of Friars Minor, accessed 18 October 2006; National Association of Italian Canadians, contact information, accessed 18 October 2006.
  13. ^ Sterling Taylor, "18 in North York seek separate school boards", 29 October 1985, ES10.