Trinity Southwest University

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Trinity Southwest University
Established 1990
Religious affiliation The Association of Christian Schools International
Executive Dean Steven Collins
Location Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States of America
Website http://www.tsu-edu.us/

Trinity Southwest University (TSU) is a Christian institution of higher education with a campus in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Principally a theological school that encompasses both the bible college and theological seminary concepts of Christian education, it offers on-campus and distance education programs leading to bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in Biblical Studies, Theological Studies, Archaeology & Biblical History, Biblical Counseling, Biblical Representational Research, and University Studies. It also fields several institutes to provide students with curricula of additional emphases. TSU does not have educational accreditation.

Most TSU students enroll in distance education. As of 2007 the typical student was an adult between 40 and 49 years old.[1]

History[edit]

TSU was founded as Southwest Biblical Seminary in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where it provided Bible-based education for local students and operated as an extension center for another seminary.[which?] The school relocated to Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1989. From 1990 to 2001, it operated as the primary U.S. extension campus of a Bible college and seminary with an international reputation.[which?] Since 2001, TSU has operated as an independent institution of higher education.[2]

Doctrine[edit]

TSU is evangelical Christian in its orientation; it calls itself "trans-denominational". The school holds that biblical scripture, specifically "the ancient Hebrew Tanakh and the New Testament", is the "divinely inspired representation of reality given by God to humankind, speaking with absolute authority in all matters upon which it touches".[3]

Affiliations and accreditation status[edit]

TSU is not accredited by any accreditor recognized by the United States Department of Education. The institution's position is that "any governmental association or oversight ... is inappropriate for a faith-based organization or institution, and constitutes a fundamental violation of church/state separation".[4] Accordingly, students are ineligible for governmental financial assistance. The institution states that it operates in New Mexico under a religious exemption authorized by state law. TSU is a member of the Association of Christian Schools International.[4]

Archaeological investigations[edit]

In partnership with the government of Jordan, TSU is engaged in archaeological investigations at Tall el-Hammam, a site in the southern Jordan River valley where investigators have found the remains of a fortified city that was destroyed circa the 18th and 19th centuries BCE.[5] In the late 2000s, TSU archaeologist Steven Collins reported that the site was likely to be the location of the biblical city of Sodom.[6]

Journal[edit]

TSU publishes the Biblical Research Bulletin, a journal of research in the areas of Biblical studies, Biblical archaeology, and Biblical geography.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard Metcalf (November 26, 2007), Consolidation, a Name, and a School, Albuquerque Journal 
  2. ^ History, Trinity Southwest University website], accessed March 10, 2012
  3. ^ Doctrinal Position, Trinity Southwest University website, accessed March 10, 2012
  4. ^ a b Affiliations, Trinity Southwest University, retrieved March 10, 2012 
  5. ^ Tall el-Hammam Excavation Project website
  6. ^ Looking Back; Claims to new Sodom locations are salted with controversy, Christianity Today, April 2008 
  7. ^ Biblical Research Bulletin website, accessed March 10, 2012

External links[edit]