Trough (geology)

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Tectonic plates with the continents in the background

In geology, a trough generally refers to a linear structural depression that extends laterally over a distance, while being less steep than a trench.

A trough can be a narrow basin or a geologic rift, often formed at the rim of a tectonic plate.

There are various oceanic troughs, troughs found under oceans; examples include

Mid-Cayman spreading centre as part of the trough, on the western edge of the Gonâve Microplate.
  1. the Cayman Trough[1]
    Location of the Nankai Trough.
  2. the Nankai Trough
    Bathymetric features to the Rockall Trough northwest of Scotland and Ireland
    North Atlantic around Iceland.
  3. the Rockall Trough and others along the rift of the mid-oceanic ridge,
  4. the Timor Trough.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Einsele, Gerhard (2000). Sedimentary Basins: Evolution, Facies, and Sediment Budget (2nd ed.). Springer. p. 630. ISBN 978-3-540-66193-1. 
  2. ^ "Chapter II (Geology of Timor-Leste)". Atlas of mineral resources of the ESCAP region Volume 17 Geology and Mineral Resources of Timor-Leste. United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific. 24 December 2003. Archived from the original on 20 May 2005.