User:Dave McKee

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drop off messages at will. Moon, Phases, Floppy disk, Chess clock

Funny message you left. Well Philip Glass is mentioned on the movie entry, if that's any consolation. :-) --KQ

Response on talk:Falsifiability: Lamarck, etc. --JG


I saw Philip Glass in concert from January 29 2002 to Feb. 2. They played Koyaanisqatsi, Powaqqatsi, various film shorts, Beauty and the Beast, and Dracula; Glass was there with his group (?) and they played the soundtracks live while the film was projected on a screen on the other side. An intense experience. --KQ


I dropped something in talk:Falsifiability I'm not trying to be a jerk, but it seems like it has degenerated into an argument about God and Evolution over actually trying to explain falsifiabilty and its more complex aspects to people. I feel that a few people on both sides are there to grind a religious axe and not to better the article. I'm not taking sides, even if I do think evolution is a great deal less preposterous than hardline creationism.

Maybe I shouldn't have butted in. As it is, I'll leave the editing up to people who know a lot more about the philosophy of science than I do.

Foxgemini

HTML[edit]

The following was moved from Talk:HTML:

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) is a markup language designed for creating web pages, that is, information presented on the World Wide Web. Derived from SGML, which was used by the publishing industry, it is now an Internet standard maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium. The specification for version 4.01 is available there.

HTML generally appears in text files either stored or created by computers, and then sent over the internet to a web browser. These files contain marked-up text, that is, instructions for how a web browser should render the page. There are a number of different kinds of markup tag in HTML - perhaps the most important being the hyperlink tag, <a>, which allows links to be made between documents on the World Wide Web. Other tags tell the browser exactly how to render the text, such as <b> and <i>, which should produce embolden and italicised text respectively, others give more general instructions, such as <em> and <strong>, which instruct the browser to emphasise the text or to make it stronger than the rest of the text. Other tags allow for metadata to be included, such as the title of the page, or delimiting the header and body sections, which are all included within the <html> .. </html> tags. Other tags which have been added later as the specification evolved allow in-line pictures and video, tables and other enhancements required.

Why doesn't this work?

HTML generally appears in text files either stored or created by computers, and then sent over the internet to a web browser. These files contain marked-up text, that is, instructions for how a web browser should render the page. There are a number of different kinds of markup tag in HTML - perhaps the most important being the hyperlink tag, <a>, which allows links to be made between documents on the World Wide Web. Other tags tell the browser exactly how to render the text, such as <b> ; &lt;b&gt;

WHAT??? Grr. I'm off to bed. Message me if you have any ideas. Dave McKee

This doesn't make sense! Brianjd | Why restrict HTML? | 07:05, 2005 Apr 17 (UTC)