User talk:174.56.160.47

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November 2013[edit]

Hello, I'm Antiqueight. I noticed that you recently made an edit to Canadian English that seemed to be a test. Your test worked! If you want more practice editing, the sandbox is the best place to do so. If you think I made a mistake, or if you have any questions, you can leave me a message on my talk page. Thanks. 🍺 Antiqueight confer 21:36, 7 November 2013 (UTC)

Nope. You made a mistake. That was not a test. 174.56.160.47 (talk) 23:00, 7 November 2013 (UTC)
I have reverted to your edit.-- 🍺 Antiqueight confer 08:49, 8 November 2013 (UTC)


Talkback[edit]

🍺 Antiqueight confer 08:49, 8 November 2013 (UTC)

January 2014[edit]

Information icon Hello, I'm Skr15081997. I wanted to let you know that I undid one or more of your recent contributions to Hákarl because it did not appear constructive. If you would like to experiment, please use the sandbox. If you think I made a mistake, or if you have any questions, you can leave me a message on my talk page. Skr15081997 (talk) 09:50, 12 January 2014 (UTC)

If this is a shared IP address, and you did not make the edits, consider creating an account for yourself so you can avoid further irrelevant notices.

July 2014[edit]

Information icon Please refrain from making unconstructive edits to Wikipedia, as you did at IKEA effect. Your edits appear to constitute vandalism and have been reverted or removed. If you would like to experiment, please use the sandbox. Administrators have the ability to block users from editing if they repeatedly engage in vandalism. Thank you. RationalBlasphemist (Speak) 22:31, 22 July 2014 (UTC)

If this is a shared IP address, and you did not make the edits, consider creating an account for yourself so you can avoid further irrelevant notices.
Stop icon with clock
Anonymous users from this IP address have been blocked temporarily from editing for abuse of editing privileges. If you have a registered Wikipedia username, you may log in and continue to edit. Otherwise, once the block has expired, you are welcome to make useful contributions. If you think there are good reasons why you should be unblocked, you may appeal this block by adding the following text below this notice: {{unblock|reason=Your reason here ~~~~}}. However, you should read the guide to appealing blocks first.  Dougweller (talk) 12:24, 30 July 2014 (UTC)
If this is a shared IP address, and you did not make the edits, consider creating an account for yourself so you can avoid further irrelevant notices.

August 2014[edit]

Information icon Hello, I'm NicatronTg. I wanted to let you know that I undid one of your recent contributions, such as the one you made with this edit to Frisian languages, because it didn’t appear constructive to me. If you think I made a mistake, or if you have any questions, you can leave me a message on my talk page. Thanks. Lucas "nicatronTg" Nicodemus (talk) 17:37, 9 August 2014 (UTC)

September 2014[edit]

Please stop making unsourced edits to the West Country dialects article. Wikipedia operates by quoting quality reliable sources and not by POV edits. You have been warned several times about your editing and if you continue you may find yourself blocked again. Thank you. David J Johnson (talk) 08:22, 24 September 2014 (UTC)

If you want West Country dialects to be unnecessarily wordy, difficult to read and difficult to understand for the average person, that's fine with me. The average person would not understand that article, or at least not the phonology section, as it stands now. The same is true of many Wikipedia articles about varieties of English. But do what you want. It doesn't bother me. There's more to my life than this. 174.56.160.47 (talk) 11:06, 24 September 2014 (UTC)
P.S. Looking at the history of West Country dialects I see that one "Wolfdog" has made many edits to that article in the past few months without citing any sources, yet neither you nor anyone else undid any of those edits or left a "threatening" comment on his talk page. Why is that? I'm just curious. 174.56.160.47 (talk) 11:42, 24 September 2014 (UTC)
No reason. Good, I'm glad we cleared that up. 174.56.160.47 (talk) 12:16, 25 September 2014 (UTC)
Answered on my Talk page. I do not monitor your Talk page and your comments should be on the article Talk page. David J Johnson (talk) 10:28, 26 September 2014 (UTC)

October 2014[edit]

I'm not sure what the BTS or DEJ references allude to, though I can say that the only initial for me that matches any of those letters is a "T." I am very interested in varieties of English, though most of my learning comes from my own study of it, outside of any academic credentials (except, perhaps, being an English major).

I do think that most formal academic language in general has at least an element of elitism in it (if not something more), but I could more precisely phrase my own feeling as a notion that many Wikipedia articles are far too technical or jargon-heavy for everyday readers. I don't have any wonderful catch-all solutions, though I would certainly support some kind of reform for certain pages. (Even the seemingly straightforward first sentence of "Diminishing returns" makes my mind start melting.)

I have tried to be relatively non-technical on the pages I've edited, or to use audio samples, actual examples of words (beside mere IPA-speak), and helpful links to make my Wikipedia edits clearer. Are you proposing anything in particular, and why does the West Country dialects page seem to be the springboard for your Wikipedia activism? Wolfdog (talk) 01:48, 15 October 2014 (UTC)

BTS and DEJ are 2 people I know about from Connecticut who know a lot about accents of English. One is a linguist, the other is kind of an amateur linguist who has a blog. I don't have any wonderful catch-all solutions either. It just bothers me that the majority of people who speak with a West Country accent, for example, probably won't understand what is meant by "/aʊ/, as in house or cow, more precisely approaches [æy] or [ɐʏ]." Could we try to use more eye dialect spellings or something? Other articles, like this one, just strike me as wwayyyy too detailed. Look at the /æ/ tensing table in that article, for example. I can't think of anyone who would care thaaat much about that subject. Maybe I should just start my own website or blog or something. That's all I have to say. Thanks for responding. 174.56.160.47 (talk) 04:15, 15 October 2014 (UTC)
Phonologists, sociolinguists, and actors are just some of the people who might care enough about that precise level of detail that differentiates particular dialects. Eye dialect spellings don't really work because they aren't universal. The spelling of "coffee" as "cawfee" may refer to the first vowel sound variously being [ɒ], [ɔ], [ɔː], [ɔə], [ʊə], or other sounds (which I've here represented with IPA). Systems like IPA or even a more limited one like Wikipedia's own respelling key work better (even though fewer people will immediately recognize their symbols) because, at least, they are universal or standardized: everyone can agree on what each symbol means since a single source has outlined what each means; in other words, there is no confusion or ambiguity. I think a better "solution" than either of these, though, is to include audio samples for Wikipedia's dialect-related articles as much as possible. On the General American page, you can see that I've actively worked to include all kinds of audio samples, so that even complete lay people can understand general or slight variations among various sounds. Wolfdog (talk) 19:15, 15 October 2014 (UTC)
OK, maybe that isn't all I have to say. I didn't think you would write anything else. I've enjoyed this "talk" so far though. I have access, through my college, to the source you cited for the /æ/ tensing table in the short a article (ANAE). I looked at p. 182, which is where you said the info for that table came from. All that's there is a big, colorful map. I understand the map just fine, but I don't get how you got that table from it. It looks a lot like OR to me. AFAICT, narrow transcriptions like [æ], [ɪə] and the like, are nowhere to be found anywhere in the entire Atlas. Not to mention that that page in the Atlas doesn't say anything at all about words like "marry" and "barrel".
Maybe it's time to start my own blog or vlog about accents. I think I can educate the average person better than Wikipedia on this topic. I think I can do it in a more entertaining, fun way too.
174.56.160.47 (talk) 03:31, 16 October 2014 (UTC)
Go for it. In terms of the p. 182 ANAE issue, that map gives a very quick, single-page outline of much of the information I included about /æ/ tensing; I simply gave that one page for the availability of people who want an easy reference. However, the entire chapter (pages 169 to 181) is all about /æ/ tensing, or "short a configurations." Are you suggesting I list all those pages?
ANAE does not use IPA, but IPA is actually a less technical, less convoluted way to describe sounds than having to give Labov's own ad hoc system and then explain it fully and long-windedly to Wikipedia audiences as though it's a widely used system that would benefit them to know. I (and it seems, most of Wikipedia's other linguistic contributors) tend to stick with IPA.
As for words like "marry" and "barrel," the Mary-marry-merry merger is widely discussed around Wikipedia, so those word sets have become a sort of standard. My reference to ANAE means that the information largely comes from that source, but there may be other sources that others should surely include too if they come across them. I listed the main relevant one I used. Others should strengthen the article by adding onto that. Wolfdog (talk) 15:06, 19 October 2014 (UTC)

November 2014[edit]

Information icon Hello, I'm Kehrbykid. I wanted to let you know that I undid one of your recent contributions —the one you made with this edit to The Wachowskis— because it didn’t appear constructive to me. If you think I made a mistake, or if you have any questions, you can leave me a message on my talk page. Thanks. Kehrbykid (talk) 18:13, 11 November 2014 (UTC)